Writing the Last Word

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Glencoe

There is always the last word, the closing argument, the final chapter in any storyline.  The End – this is where the reader closes the book and says, “I wish there was more…”

As we write our personal narratives, our words gather momentum as we age.  Recall that great feats and resolutions happen towards the end, not at the beginning. Perhaps that is the reason memoirs are generally written in the “denouement” stage of life.  Looking through the lens of age it is easier to sort out the complications and fashion a fitting outcome to a life well lived.

Gloria Swanson confessed, “I’ve given my memoirs far more thought than any of my marriages.  You can’t divorce a book.”  Winston Churchill said, “History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.” Conversely, the Comte de Lautreamont said “I will leave no memoirs.”  Frank Harris, editor and journalist, declared that, “Memoirs are a well-known form of fiction.”

Whether we write, paint, sing, dance or live our memoirs, one thing is certain – no one else can write our story as eloquently or passionately. The journey continues – write with enthusiasm.  Recall the words of Frank Herbert, “There is no real ending. It’s just the place where you stop the story.”