The Right Time

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The Right Time

“Virtue can only flourish among equals.”

Mary Wollstonecraft

Mary Wollstonecraft (1759 – 1797) was a British writer, philosopher and advocate of women’s rights. She was also the mother of Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, aka Mary Shelley who gave us “Frankenstein.”

Mary Wollstonecraft wrote novels, travel narratives, a conduct book and history of the French Revolution.  She is best known for “A Vindication of the Rights of Woman” which argues that women are not naturally inferior to men.  After her death at the age of 38, a memoir published by her husband revealed an unconventional lifestyle, which inadvertently ruined her reputation for almost a century. Her ideas and writings experienced a rebirth with the appearance of the feminist movement at the turn of the twentieth century.

Mary Wollstonecraft’s life was a reflection of her values and beliefs.  The age in which she lived was unable to grasp the significance of her ideas, but our age considers her to be one of the founding feminist philosophers.  Her life and work continues to inspire and challenge.

“I do not wish them [women] to have power over men; but over themselves.” 
 Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

18 thoughts on “The Right Time

    • I always liked that name! I just looked it up and found that the name comes the forms of Marie, Maria, Miriam, Miryam. And then there is J.R.R. Tolkien’s, Merry or Meriadoc.

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      • I agree – remember in Anne of Green Gables, Anne insisted that her name be pronounced with an ‘E”?

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      • Actually, she wanted to be called Cordelia!

        “Oh, it makes SUCH a difference. It LOOKS so much nicer.
        When you hear a name pronounced can’t you always see it in
        your mind, just as if it was printed out? I can; and A-n-n
        looks dreadful, but A-n-n-e looks so much more distinguished.
        If you’ll only call me Anne spelled with an E I shall try to
        reconcile myself to not being called Cordelia.””

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    • I agree – she made decisions based on her ideas – not someone else’s! Even today, she challenges me to look more closely at my thought process.

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  1. Why is it that many now famous people and their now respected ideas were not respected in their lifetime. Sad, it is!

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  2. A remarkable woman and a great shot of Big Ben. Thanks Rebecca. There was a programme on about Big Ben recently. Apparently there is a crack in the bell which happened quite early on in its life. It was never repaired and is the reason for the slightly discordant sound of the chimes which make the sound of Big Ben recogniseable allover the world.

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    • Thank you for adding to the story. I never knew that Big Ben had a crack in the bell. Which proves that you don’t have to be perfect to be amazing!

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  3. I think it is hard for us truly to see the importance of great work in the here and now. It’s still a great pity though that historians get all the fun – hence we can enjoy the fruits of those before us.

    Mr T and I once went to the top of St Stephen’s Tower for a tour around the clock works & Big Ben, by the way – so interesting and fabulous London views!

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    • How well said! Whenever I look at the “History Channel” all of the historians get excited about the little details that, when brought together, add up to enormous progress. You’re right, they seem to be having a great deal of fun. I loved standing under Big Ben!!! Never made it to the top of St. Stephen’s Tower…that means I must go back!

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    • I agree! We come to think that the struggle only started in our time. It really is amazing how many women have stood for equality over the centuries.

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