A Global Voice

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Pathway

This year, marks the 100th anniversary of Pauline Johnson’s passing.  She died on March 7, 1913 of breast cancer, three days short of her 52nd birthday. In the end, she called Vancouver home. Her last wish was to be buried in her beloved Stanley Park.  The city of Vancouver granted her request with the proviso that she be cremated. Pauline Johnson’s ashes were held in an urn encased within a small concrete vault that was gently placed in the ground.  A granite boulder, which boasted a carving of double hearts, the tribal badge of the Mohawk, marked her grave.  Today, what remains is a stone monument, established by the Women’s Club of Vancouver, as a final tribute.

Monument

Pauline Johnson was a global voice that embraced universal themes of tradition, nature and compassion.  These are dialogues that cannot be limited by time, space or culture.   She honoured the customs of the past by preserving and sharing the stories; she paved the way for women and First Nation writers and performers to boldly pursue an artist’s path; most of all, she believed that what she wrote and spoke about was important. A woman of Mohawk and English parentage, living at the turn of a new century spoke for all of humanity.  May we have the courage to do the same.

A Toast

There’s wine in the cup, Vancouver,
And there’s warmth in my heart for you,
While I drink to your health, your youth, and your wealth,
And the things that you yet will do.
In a vintage rare and olden,
With a flavour fine and keen,
Fill the glass to the edge, while I stand up to pledge
My faith to my western queen.  Continue reading