The Philosophy Narratives

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“Man is the only creature who refuses to be what he is.”
Albert Camus

 The Beginning

The other day, someone asked me, “What is your philosophy of life?”

We talk about philosophy as if it were something that could be summarized in one or two sentences.  And yet, it generally takes a lifetime to identify with the reality. It is more than a thought, a response or a single activity.  It is our entire worldview, our personal system of principles for guidance in practical affairs.

The “philosophy question” has been in the back of my mind over the past couple of weeks, especially as I was researching the ancient scientists.  It seems that their philosophy was the precursor to their scientific investigations.

Philosophical discussions rarely have neat and tidy outcomes because the business of philosophy is to challenge prevailing assumptions and concepts in order to generate new perspectives on complex problems.  This week will focus on beginnings.  That is the only place that will give us the genesis of this worthy conversation that has spanned the history of humanity.

“Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” 
 Plato

 

22 thoughts on “The Philosophy Narratives

    • Thanks Cindy! Camus certainly had a way of synthesizing huge questions into a simple sentence. He demands our full attention.

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  1. I always find it interesting that philosophy’s origins stem literally from a love of wisdom. That humble place is probably the best of beginnings.

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    • I agree! There is a special kind of curiosity that says, I am but a participant in a wondrous universe. I wonder what it is all about…

      Your presence and comments are very much appreciated.

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  2. I like your both quotes and I think about it.
    Something is a very special word and I think I can work with it.
    Greetings to you from Susanne

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    • Thank you so much Susanne for your kind comments. Sometimes we forget to “think” before we “speak.” It is something that I continue to work on…

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  3. I always feel a little boxed in/caged by that kind of question but then philosophy was not my best subject at college. 😦

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  4. Hi Rebecca: Thank you for leading us to think, to analyze, to pursue, and to formulate our own interpretation. I am just back from Yunnan. Missed your posts!

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    • Welcome back!!! I knew you were on an adventure somewhere! Looking forward to reading all about it!! Great to have you stop by…

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  5. Rebecca, I admire your adventure in this domain, I love it but it’s always a difficult area to explore …. Camus, I admire him, he is just so charming, I am bewitched by his novel “The Stranger”, the film is also nice. Plato, so wise, need more time to read his notion. I suddenly thought of Joan Miro’s interesting painting “Two Philosophers” (because of you).

    Have you read Camus’ “The Myth of Sisyphus”? The whole essay, especially its last sentence just made me “cry” – ” …. The struggle itself towards the heights is enough to fill a man’s heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy.”

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    • You have so much more knowledge in this area than I do so I am looking forward to your words of wisdom as we go along. I will remember this quote as we continue the journey…

      “The struggle itself towards the heights is enough to fill a man’s heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy.”

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      • In fact I have very little knowledge on philosophy, I read very few books only and know only a few philosophers’ ideas. But just by chance Albert Camus is my favourite (perhaps because he looked pretty handsome, haha).

        Also a few days ago I read a blogger’s post on Shakespeare’s Tragedy of Macbeth, he raised a number of ideas to me, also to correct (or expand) my thinking about certain words : light, shadow, darkness …. I confessed to him/her that I never thought of words in his/her way. You came across his/her blog? http://booksontrial.wordpress.com/

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      • Dear Macbeth!! I read Peter Ackroyd’s. “Shakespeare: The Biography” which provided a great deal of insight into why Shakespeare presented this play to King James I. There is always a story behind the story that makes everything that much more interesting. Thanks for the lead on “books on trial” – have signed up to follow!!!

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  6. Great post…someone asked me the same philosophical question, I smiled back and said “just live and live just”. I think that bamboozled him…

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    • You are indeed a philosopher – your five words: “just live and live just” says all that is needed to be said….

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