The Gift of Days

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“It’s being here now that’s important. There’s no past and there’s no future. Time is a very misleading thing. All there is ever, is the now. We can gain experience from the past, but we can’t relive it; and we can hope for the future, but we don’t know if there is one.” 
George Harrison

Gift of Days

Last week’s series on Lord Nelson and Lady Hamilton reminded me of the days of our lives.  We are born, we live, love and create our narratives by our thoughts and by actions that reflect our personal hopes and dreams. Much of our days are filled with routine tasks, moments which are easily lost within the framework of those we consider extraordinary.

Looking back, we remember birthdays, anniversaries, weddings and holidays.  We rarely recall the commonplace day-to-day deeds that mark our existence.  And yet, I would argue that these are the times that create our cultural values.  They are the foundation on which we participate within our communities and ultimately leave a legacy for the future.

People have lived within the ordinary for centuries, yet their lives and contributions have been extraordinary.  We know this by those farsighted few who thought to record the specific circumstances and events.  How many others have been forever lost in history?  The combination of all of those seemingly humdrum occurrences are the legacies  from previous generations who lived in hope of a better future.

What happened in the past that was relevant to me today?  June 10th was a very active day.  In 1429, Joan of Arc’s army defeated the Earl of Suffolk and his forces. In 1610, the first Dutch settlers landed on Manhattan Island, while in 1837, the Versailles Palace became a national museum in France.  In 1935, W. Wilson and R. Smith established Alcoholics Anonymous in the United States and in 1940, Italy declared war on Britain and France.  Every one of these events impacted our “today.”

Over the next few weeks, I want to explore the gift of days.

“As if you could kill time without injuring eternity”
Henry David Thoreau

Special note:  For the next three weeks, I will be working on a special “work” project and may not respond to you in my usual time frame.  I value your comments and likes.  You continue to inspire and challenge me on the journey we call “life.”  You are remarkable.

Rebecca aka Clanmother