Creative Spirits & Innovative Cities

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FAÇADE Festival 2017

It was a late night in early September.  The summer warmth lingered, still unwilling to give way to a cooler season. The muted lights of Vancouver’s downtown cafes spilled onto the streets, mingling with laughter, voices and the aroma of fragrant spices.

In the midst of a vibrant night scene, one street commanded a hushed audience fully engaged within a mythological world of light and music.  It was opening night of the FAÇADE Festival 2017 that began at 7:30 p.m. and would end at Midnight.

The FAÇADE  Festival is a week-long public art production presented by the Burrard Arts Foundation in partnership with the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Jane Jacobs once wrote, “Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because and only when they are created by everybody.” Artistic expression is the foundation of bringing communities together.  When we recognize and share our creative spirit we are building innovative cities that will continue to thrive within a vast global world.

 

20 thoughts on “Creative Spirits & Innovative Cities

    • It was one of those serendipity moments that comes unannounced to remind us that we live in a world full of surprises. This event featured the marvelous mythology that comes from the Heilsuk tradition. I didn’t make it to the last event, but I have now signed up for event notifications to ensure that I don’t miss next year’s performance. Public art has an extraordinary way of integrating cultural experiences. I am delighted that you stopped by to join me.

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  1. Beautiful, I love the way you write. The photos are really unusual as well. Were you able to attend the Facade festival–I am sure it is unusual? Thank you for sharing!!

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    • I had no idea that the Facade Festival was in progress when we headed downtown to attend a movie. It was happenstance that we came upon this scene. This was a collaboration between two artists: Shawn Hunt a Heiltsuk artist and Evan Sibens, a former dancer with the National ballet of Canada.

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  2. This is an excellent post … I am loving the Façade Festival… Shadows and shapes… Are they real?. Plato would say they are not, as they are copies or projections of things… and things are copies of Ideas… Plato´s allegory of the cave: I couldn´t help it! 😀 Anyway… I think reality can be also what we imagine, what do you think?….. hugs 😉

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    • An excellent point Aquileana, especially in our world that is riveted by opinion and emotional stimuli. It is an easy default position, given that the act of thinking requires a diligent desire to seek knowledge, to consider possibilities and ideas that may first appear counterintuitive. I especially appreciate Plato’s thought: “We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.” I enjoy our conversations! Many hugs coming back your way.

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  3. What a marvellous initiative – all the more enjoyable for being an impromptu find. I adore this kind of artistic creation – so visceral and affecting.😀❤️

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    • It reminded me of the marvelous Fringe Festival in Edinburgh. Creative energy brings out the best in a city, and engages participation. I often think of what it would have been like to attend a medieval fair. Can you imagine all of the music, dance and minstrels!!!

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      • How wonderful to have been part of such an event. I have always thought it would be marvellous to attend one of the traditional ‘frost fairs’, especially in the days when rivers and lakes used to ice up enough for skating over here. 🙂

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  4. A wonderful festival and thank you for sharing it with us! I love the creativeness of the event and how you presented it to us. Your photos delight 🙂

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    • You are a wonderful encouragement and support, Christy. You continue to inspire and promote a compassionate community of bloggers. Thank you!!

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    • I’m trying to entice you to visit our fair city! I agree wholeheartedly – The ancients never disappoint. They will forever inspire us with their universal truth. Hugs coming across the waves! Always appreciate your visits!🤗🤗🤗

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    • You would have loved being here. A full crowd without chatter. Interesting how the musical rhythm influenced the visual, which changed slowly as if to say, this is the “real” pace of life, not a frantic run to an unknown finish line.

      I still haven’t figured out how the reader works, but I continue to persevere. I don’t want to miss any of your adventures. Hugs!

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  5. Façade Festival, what an imaginary idea…! Interesting prompt, that of your Aquileana follower. Shadows and shapes, real and imagined are such a huge part of our world, influencing for and against us. As for my scribbles, these are two conditions of inspiration that feed many of my poems. Thus I as well cannot help reacting to Plato saying shadows and shapes are not real, they being projections of things, as said things are copies of ideas. This brings to mind, far we have come, in but a few years since Plato’s time. Thus so I cite a silly but convincing comparison. A black and white movie of my youth’s, pictures a man going to the moon. This space man was called Flash Gordon, who dressed in loose-fitting tights, with a World War II type pilot’s helmet, and supposed space boots, etc. is heading for the moon. An impossible mission we thought could never happen. An idea that could not be real, made to entertain children. Many years later, entering the lobby of a hotel in Portugal, Lisbon to be exact(no TV in hotel rooms back then) I watch a man saying he had taken a giant step for man, while planting a US flag on the moon. Ergo a projection of ideas of real or unreal things, eventually got man on the moon. And so we continue to live in the façades that reflect the shadows and shapes of life and of things and thoughts, that is after all about man for better or for worse.

    Thank you for this wonderful inspiring post, Rebecca!

    Jean-Jacques

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    • Thank you, dear Jean-Jacques for your thoughtful discussion. I remember my grandfather saying to me: “I was born into a time when there were no cars, and now I have seen a man walk on the moon.” I find that with time, history becomes shadows and fits into our current reality. Mythologies in the past are a precursor to our inventions. You have given me much to think on today as we celebrate Thanksgiving. All the very best of my gratitude coming your way.

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