Sunday Evening Reflection: The Moss Lady

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“Even a soul submerged in sleep is hard at work and helps make something of the world.”

 Heraclitus, Fragments

Sleep is our best friend, bringing us the gifts of good health and well-being and allowing us to live our best life. In our joy of being awake, we cannot forget that sleep allows us many benefits.  Even the ancients knew that “Even a soul submerged in sleep is hard at work and helps make something of the world.”

After a restful night’s sleep, our decisions are more in-tune, our learning improves as does our memory and physical reflexes.  We pay attention to our environment and our emotional state is more relaxed.  Our world view is enhanced and with it our creativity.  Sleep is our best friend.

Last fall, I met the Moss Lady in Beacon Hill Park, Victoria, British Columbia.  She came to life in 2015 and was inspired by the Mud Maid in Cornwall’s Lost Garden of Heligan.  Artist Dale Doebert worked with the Victoria City park team to create the elegant 35-feet-long Moss Lady, using boulders, pipes, cement and wire.  She rests serenely under a specially designed clay-based acidic soil so moss can cloak her while she sleeps.

You are welcome to join me on the path to visit the Moss Lady. May we embrace the gift of sleep in the same spirit as this gracious lady.

Sunday Evening Reflection: At the Orpheum

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The Vancouver Orpheum

The Vancouver Orpheum opened its doors on November 8, 1927. Ah, it was a grand building, the largest theatre in Canada at the time, with a construction price tag of $1.25 million.  Three thousand seats awaited an audience eager to see the interior of the much-awaited theatre.

Buildings have biographies and encounter transitions that reflect our ever-changing societies. Would it surprise you to know that the Vancouver Orpheum was launched as a vaudeville house? The vaudeville that became popular in North America from the early 1880s until the early 1930s, was similar to the music halls of Victorian Britain.

When the voices and acts of vaudeville’s singers, dancers, comedians and magicians fell silent in the late 1930’s, the Orpheum became a movie house, under the Famous Players name.

The crisis occurred in 1973.

In 1973, Famous Players made a financial decision that would change the course of our beloved Orpheum’s history. The Orpheum was scheduled for a major upgrade to a multiplex.  The magnificent interior was to be gutted.  The public protest was heard across Vancouver and beyond.  Even Jack Benny made an emotional appearance.

The Orpheum was saved.

The City of Vancouver bought the Orpheum and closed the theatre on November 23, 1975 to complete a full restoration. April 2, 1977 the Orpheum was reopened and is now the permanent home of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. Two years later, in 1979, the Orpheum was designated a National Historic Site of Canada.

During December, our family attended a performance of Handel’s Messiah.  After the crowds dispersed, I stayed behind to capture a few photos to celebrate the history of this noble building and all those who came together to save its legacy for generations to come.

Come, join me on a short walk through a building that has graced Vancouver for nearly 100 years.

 

Music by Cercles Nouvelles “Palace Garden Roses” Epidemic Sound

Happy Valentine’s Day

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“Being deeply loved by someone gives you strength, while loving someone deeply gives you courage.”

Lao Tzu

Celebrating Valentine’s Day is about gratitude for love and friendship

Thank you to my writer friends who have created stories that give meaning to my days.

Thank you to the artists who have shared their vision with the world.

Thank you to the poets, philosophers, teachers and mentors, who have challenged me to think deeply and embrace new knowledge.

To all my family and friends who live close and far.  Your support and encouragement has given strength, beauty and wisdom to my journey.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

“When we love, we always strive to become better than we are. When we strive to become better than we are, everything around us becomes better too.”

Paulo Coelho, The Alchemist

Sunday Evening Reflection: Who has seen the wind?

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The wind and trees have a special relationship. Together, they create exquisite music that comes with fluttering leaves and waving branches. The fresh air that trees bestow on this earth brings a sense of well-being.  A recent Instagram post by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization stated that “studies show that trees boost happiness and reduce stress levels.”

Trees are the vital source of fruits, medicines, oxygen.  They decrease the greenhouse effect and prevent soil erosion, which in turn prevents water pollution.  Under the shade of trees, wildlife find protection.

Tonight, I am celebrating trees with poetry by Christina Georgina Rossetti.  Embracing the dance of the wind and trees.

Who has seen the wind?

Who has seen the wind?
Neither I nor you.
But when the leaves hang trembling,
The wind is passing through.

Who has seen the wind?
Neither you nor I.
But when the trees bow down their heads,
The wind is passing by.

Christina Georgina Rossetti

 

 

Sunday Evening Reflection: Desiderata

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“You are a child of the universe no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.”

 

Tonight, I am going back in time to the moment I first heard Desiderata, which is Latin for “things desired”.

It was the beginning of a new year and a new decade – 1970.

A poster designed to look like ancient parchment with the Desiderata written boldly in an elegant script was a treasured purchase. It remained on my study desk for inspiration and traveled with me to college a few years later.

2020, the Desiderata continues to be relevant as I look forward to the years ahead.  It is a new year and a new decade.

Desiderata by Max Ehrmann Recitation by Rebecca Budd from Rebecca Budd aka Clanmother on Vimeo.

 

Desiderata

Go placidly amid the noise and the haste and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even to the dull and the ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain or bitter, for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals, and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is as perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore, be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be. And whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life, keep peace in your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.

Max Ehrmann, 1948