Sunday Evening Reflection – Good Things Will Come

Walking is a way to see the world through stories. Every street and road holds narratives created by those who have traveled the path. Memories live within locations, in walls, windows, doors, archways. As I walk, I add my own chapter by imagining the laughter, conversations, events that occurred over the years.

A blogger friend asked me if I knew the origin of “if these walls could talk.” I have found the meaning – that something happened in the room or building, but the details are blurred and we must use our imaginations to interpret the unknowns. Alas, I have not uncovered the beginnings of the phrase that has been used over the years and is captured in books, movies and everyday speech. The search continues.

This past week, I retraced my steps to a street where the 2019 Vancouver Mural Festival transformed buildings into stories. Twenty-five new murals came into being last summer. Tonight, my Sunday Evening Reflection will feature a mural of a young woman, created by William Liao.

Last year, this street was alive with laughter and celebration. This year there is solitude. And yet, as I viewed the mural, there came to me a confirmation that this time will pass. Good things will come. This is a time for reflection and an inner journey.

William Liao did not give us markings or signs that tell us this young woman’s story. We are left to create it ourselves. He gave us freedom to enter his world and participate. Come, join me and imagine the possibilities.

 

42 Comments

  1. I love everything about this post! Life is, after all, story. As I was reading your comments about William Liao’s painting, the thought popped into my head that some ekphrastic writing about street art might be in order.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I LOVE this idea, Liz. You were the first to tell me what “ekphrastic” poetry was all about – “a vivid, often dramatic, verbal description of a visual work of art, either real or imagined.” How would someone new to poetry (this would be me) begin? Oh, this is a marvelous conversation waiting to happen.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Thanks, Rebecca! Ekphrastic poetry can be approached in different ways. For someone new to it, I’d suggest starting with a description of your experience as viewer. How do you interact with the work of art? What do you see? How does it make you feel? What does it prompt you to think about?

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Clanmother says:

        Thank you – have saved these questions. Stay tuned.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I’m looking forward to reading what you come up with!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. cindy knoke says:

    “This is a time for reflection and an inner journey.”
    You will excel at this Rebecca.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      We are on a momentous journey, Cindy. What will bring hope is the heartwarming messages and thoughts of our blogging community. Thank you for bringing the beauty of photography to my day.

      Like

  3. Carolyn Page says:

    What a special artist is he, Rebecca.
    I have a certain affinity with portrait artistry, which is hard to define. However, I believe it is one of the most difficult to do well.
    Immediately upon viewing the image you’ve chosen to highlight I was destined to see more of William Liao’s work. I clicked upon the link, and was not disappointed.
    I looked within the various collections on offer; and enjoyed them all. It was, however, his portrait collection (Life & Fate) that held my attention. I also visited two of his videos on youtube showing his (condensed) workings of two portrait sittings. I believe this man captures the heart and soul in his interpretation. I would be so honoured…

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I share your thoughts, Carolyn – William Laio does capture the heart and souls in his interpretation. I am delighted that you explored the his artistry. His thoughts on creativity, how he uses meditation to begin his paintings resonated with me. https://youtu.be/ULuTn4qVOcc. I am honoured that you stopped and truly appreciative your comments. Happy Monday!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Carolyn Page says:

        A lovely video, Rebecca. I enjoyed it. Such a sweet man.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. that looks like a wonderful piece of street art

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      I a grateful for our mural artists that bring empty streets and old buildings new stories to tell. Thank you so much for your comments. Happy Monday!!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Klausbernd says:

    Dear Clanmother,
    we like your idea that “Every street and road holds narratives created by those who have traveled the path”. Robert Macfarlane was the first author who made me aware of the history of a place as an integral part of its geography. Indeed, it is!
    Wishing you a wonderful week, keep well and happy.
    With big HUGS
    The Fab Four of Cley
    🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      Dear Klausbernd, I have never heard of Robert Macfarlane before so did a mini-research just now and came up with a couple of titles for possible reading: “Underland” and “The Old Ways.” What book would you suggest. I just finished Pascal Mercier’s Night Train to Lisbon. This is the quote that gave me the idea of reading it. “We leave something of ourselves behind when we leave a place, we stay there, even though we go away. And there are things in us that we can find again only by going back there.” Welcome to a new week! I am so glad that we started it together. Love and hugs going to my dear friends, the Fab Four of Cley.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Klausbernd says:

        Dear Clanmother,
        we read all the books of Pascal Mercier (his real name is Peter Bieri) and met him in Berlin. “Night Train to Lisbon” was the first of his books I read. He gave me a copy when we met. I actually was asked by my editor to read another book, so I only wanted to have a quick look at this novel and read it to the end within two days.
        I really like Robert Macfarlane’s “Underland” and prefer it to “The Old Ways”. I am sure you will like it. It’s a good mixture of info, philosophical reflexion and a little bit of suspense as well.
        With lots of love and hugs. Stay well
        Klausbernd 🙂
        The Fab Four of Cley
        🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Clanmother says:

        Thank you so much. Exciting to know that you have read “Night Train to Lisbon” and met the author – the narrative evolved brilliantly. By the time I was through reading, I wanted to take the night train to Lisbon. Onward to “Underland”. Hugs and Hugs and lots of love to my dearest friends, the Fab Four of Cley.

        Like

  6. Wonderful mural and reflections, Rebecca. She must be feeling lonely at the moment.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      Thank you, Sylvia. Yes, there was a feeling of loneliness with the quiet streets and memories of a different time. And yet, she remains ever vigilant, ever hopeful of better times. As I left, I placed my hand on the wall and promised to visit her again. Somehow, it felt like the right thing to do.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ah, that was a lovely thing to do. I know you’ll keep your promise. 🤗

        Liked by 1 person

  7. J.D. Riso says:

    That’s a stunning mural. Every street does indeed have its own story. When I lived in cities, I used to wander for hours and listen.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      Your blog posts were testament to the stories held in cities. Every street has a special feeling. When I lived in a small mining community in Northern Manitoba, I remember walking the Main Street on the way to school. I looked forward to passing the bakery and listening to the clatter of baking equipment and smelling the aroma of bread and pastry coming through the doors. Even in the deep minus temperatures, the feeling was unmistakably “home.” To this day, it remains unique and clear in my memory.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Mary Jo Malo says:

    I continue being amazed at all the wonderful street art in Vancouver. What a beautiful mural. So full of passion and longing, those very things we experience while walking our quiet streets, waiting for vibrant activities to resume. The music was perfect. Thank you always for sharing your optimism and positive outlook. These days it inspires me more than ever. Hugs!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      You are a wonderful support to me, Mary Jo. Your encouragement and generosity are truly appreciated. The mural’s rich and vibrant colours are in sharp contrast to the grey concrete and electrical wires. It would be easy to think that the mural was out of place, but to me it belongs exactly where it is. I think of the young woman as the guardian of the street, a caring spirit that brings a gentleness to city life.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Ms Frances says:

    When I look at this painting my own reflections come to mind, probably very different than the others who enjoy the image. I have pictures in my mind from my life that come to me when I think of pictures, painted and scenes remembered that bring memories so good and precious. God gave us brains that are able to remember., Thank you for reminding us to use our imaginations and value them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      What a profound statement! Yes, when I look back at my reflection via photos from past years, I see the many events that have become integrated into my memories. I am finding that when we enjoy the moments, they allow us to expand our thinking.

      Like

  10. Sharifah says:

    A great post, Rebecca. It is a good reminder to me that artistic creation evolves from stories around us, and to be receptive to them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      How very well said, Sharifah. The idea of being open, receptive allows us to explore, engage and celebrate.

      Like

  11. Ah, Rebecca, beautiful street art!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      I am grateful for our street and mural artists. They share their work, knowing it will be open to the wind, rain and heat.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh, very rightfully so! I’d also be very grateful for such amazing artists! xoxoxo

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Resa says:

    That is one heck of a great work of art! What a talent!
    Your video journey showing us the close up work is wonderful. I always enjoy your videos , and your Sunday Evening Reflections.
    The street is quiet now, but it will be alive and noisy again!
    Stay safe, Rebecca! Hugs!

    Like

    1. Clanmother says:

      They will indeed come back, even stronger and more vibrant because with have chosen to live deliberately, with compassion and expectation. Hugs and more hugs coming your way.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Resa says:

        {{{hugs}}}

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Jean-Jacques says:

    Your followers have said it all… and indeed what used to be called graffiti, some were nothing but, the real talent started to come thru to become the open air, out door murals dressing up and beautifully decorating city streets, many of which are on a permanent basis. What a marvelous present they be… Lucky are the citizens who have access ! Thanks, Rebecca for sharing this wonderful work.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      Thank you for joining me, Jean-Jacques – very much appreciated.. It was a poignant walk that day, for the streets were empty as we walked to the nearby grocery store. But I did meet up with my friends, the crows, who cheered me with their chattering. Bless them!

      Like

  14. Annika Perry says:

    Rebecca, your post grabbed me from your very first line:’Walking is a way to see the world through stories’. So true, they are all around us and as I walk I imagine them, recreating the stories from what I see around me.

    I love William Liao’s work which you share here, expressive, haunting … what a very different experience to see them in solitude, without the excited buzz of a crowd.

    Wishing you well, blessings and love to my my friend
    Annika xx❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      Thank you for your heartwarming comments. We are living in an time of uncertainty and are active participants in the evolving narrative encompassing our world. It is unprecedented. We will be telling this story in the years to come. When I look back I want to remember that I chose hope, resilience, kindness and compassion. Take care of yourself and wonderful family! Stay safe.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. What a beautiful post. And in these quiet moments things have come. There are those who might only have found sadness looking at this street right now. Not a soul like yours though. I have always loved that saying about walls and it’s so true when you think of everything they have witnessed, sometimes there if you take the time to imagine . .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      Thank you, Shehanne! Resa (https://artgowns.com/ ) was my guide on “murals”. She is a “mural treasure hunter” when it comes to searching every street and corner to find a new artist. I feel like I am tagging along with her on an adventure. I never know where we will end up!

      Like

      1. She is amazing with that. She really picks them out. AND that’s just one part of her. xxxxxxxx

        Liked by 1 person

  16. nitinsingh says:

    Lovely post

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      Thank you so much for your heartwarming comment!

      Like

Comments are closed.