Sunday Evening Reflection: On the Atlantic Coast

The Atlantic Ocean covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth’s surface or 41,105,000 square miles.  Named after the Greek god, Atlas, a Titan condemned to hold up the celestial heavens for eternity, the Atlantic presides between North and South America on the west and Europe and Africa on the east. Up north, the Atlantic connects to the Arctic Ocean and to the Southern Ocean to the south. Tonight, I have travelled to Torbay, Newfoundland, to experience the brisk winds that come off the Atlantic and view the iceberg on the horizon.

Torbay’s history goes back to the start of the early English fishery in the late 1500s. It received its name from another Torbay, located in Devon, England. The name comes from the Anglo-Saxon “Tor” which signifies “a rocky hill.” There is history in every step I take as I walk along the beach and up the hill to overlook the town. It is peaceful, with only the sounds of wind and waves. It is hard to imagine the bedlam that would have ensued when the Community of Torbay sustained three French Campaigns during the early years (1696- 1762). And then there was the famous pirate, John Nutt, who moved with his family from Devon to settle in the New World. But that is another story.

Join me as I walk along the beach and feel the cold breeze come across the Atlantic.

54 Comments Add yours

  1. Let's Cook says:

    Hi dear
    Would be glad if you follow my blog. Would love to have you as friend

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      Thank you for stopping by and for your comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh, Rebecca, that was such an inspiring and refreshing walk… I feel like I was there. 😊😘🤗

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I am so glad that you were with me on the beach. While travel has been curtailed for now, I am enjoying going back in time. I will be heading over your way soon!!! Hugs.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. It was a really enjoyable flashback, Rebecca!
        Many many hugs back! 🙂 xoxo

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Dave Astor says:

    You went east this week, Rebecca! Lovely post — the words, the images, and the soaring music in the video. And of course Newfoundland is not that far from “Anne of Green Gables” territory on Prince Edward Island. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I was so close to PEI and yet never made it to that marvelous island. When I was in Saint John’s Newfoundland, I visited the local bookstore that was filled with many wonderful stories about Newfoundland. I left with a amazing book in my hand. When I came home, I put the book in a special bookshelf/place, ready for reading. I can’t find the book. I have made several attempts, one last night when I was writing about Newfoundland for this post. Alas, it is lost. How could this happen?The book was about supernatural events that occurred in Newfoundland. Obviously, the book has mysteriously disappeared. Will let you know when it comes back….

      Liked by 4 people

  4. Oh, this is wonderful. So much history and stories here I’m now away finding out all about over my coffee. Thank you for this marvellous post. I can see why John Nutt came to live here.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      When I came across John Nutt, I thought of you because you would love this story. John Nutt, a 17th-century English pirate, was one of the more notorious brigands of his time raiding the coast of southern Canada and western England for over three years before his capture by Sir John Eliot in 1623. There was a double cross by Sir John Eliot, but a rescue before the dreaded end. But things didn’t fare so well for Sir John Eliot. Oh, the twists and turns of life. Sending many hugs!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. yes. i went and read about him. it is fascinating. I espesh liked the fact though that he ‘ rescued’ press-ganged men and paid them decent wages. I bet they loved pirating with him.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Living the pirate’s life was not for the faint of heart!

        Liked by 3 people

      3. Clanmother says:

        So very true, Liz! And there are no is no X to mark the spot, as evidenced by all the digging that goes on at Oak Island.

        Liked by 2 people

  5. Klausbernd says:

    Dearest Rebecca,
    I was always fascinated by Newfoundland and Labrador and visited this area several times when living in Montreal. Later it was Annie Proulx’s novel “Shipping News” that even increased my fascination for this area.
    Thank you very much for your nicely done video.
    With lots of love and hugs
    XXXX
    The Fab Four of Cley
    🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Oh, Klausbernd, it was a cold day on the beach so wore a coat and a windbreaker. (We were in off season which is my favorite time to travel). I have never heard about Annie Proulx’s Pulitzer Prize novel “Shipping News” – many thanks for the introduction. This is a must read for me, especially as it relates to Canada. When you traveled to Newfoundland did you go through the Newfoundland ceremony “screech-in”? The “screech-in” is open to all non-Newfoundlanders (known to Newfoundlanders as a “come from away” or “mainlander”) “involving a shot of screech, a short recitation and the kissing of a cod.” I confess I did not participate even though the invitation is a hearty warm welcome to Newfoundland. Thank you for joining me on the coast of Newfoundland. It is only 4 hours, by air, to reach England. Sending lots of love and hugs back to my dear friends The Fab Four of Cley.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Klausbernd says:

        Dear Rebecca,
        no, unfortunately I didn’t take part in the ‘screech-in’. Kissing the cod is fine but in Denmark following Grimm’s fairy tale ‘The Frog Prince’ you have to kiss a toad when you marry. I would prefer kissing a cod.
        When I travelled to St. John’s it was pretty cold too. I was invited to teach at the university there. But in these times I was very ambitious and saw that I couldn’t make career there.
        Wishing you all the best, sending you love and hugs
        Klausbernd 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Clanmother says:

        I loved that story of The Frog Prince!!! I am certain their is a life lesson in this fairy tale. I was surprised by the bitterly cold wind, Klausbernd, especially when we climbed Signal Hill. I tried to take a few photos but, the wind was so high that I had to concentrate on walking or be swept away. Isn’t it interesting the paths that are in front of us as we move forward in our timeline. Sending hugs and love back to my dear friends, the Fab Four of Cley.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Klausbernd says:

        In this novel “Shipping News” there are scenes where the high winds are described. The winds can be that furious there that they had to fix their houses with steel ropes.
        With love, kisses and hugs
        The Fab Four of Cley
        🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Gallivanta says:

    Beautiful. And how astonishing ( to me) to see the iceberg so close to shore.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Newfoundland and Labrador are famous for iceberg watching. We came in late April, but I have read that the best viewing is in late May and early June along the coast of Newfoundland, and between March and July along the coast of Labrador. I understand that some icebergs are less than 5 kilometers from the shore so I share you astonishment that they can be so close to land. I am delighted that you joined me on the walk along the beach. Sending hugs!

      Liked by 4 people

    2. That was my thought as well, Ann!

      Liked by 3 people

  7. A beautiful post, Rebecca. The timelessness of the eternal ocean never fails to touch and uplift my spirit. At the moment, I’m feeling the need for some Vitamin Sea, and walking with you along the beach was a real treat. xxx

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Your post on “wet” inspired me Sylvia. I had planned on a tour of an Urban Garden, but when I read your post I remembered a chilly day on the coast of Newfoundland. So thank you prompting the memory. I needed some Vitamin Sea too!! We belong to the sea even thought we will never know all of its secrets! Hugs!!!!

      Liked by 4 people

      1. I’m so happy that my post resonated with you so much that you changed your mind and took us to the seaside. 😃😘🤗

        Liked by 2 people

  8. Ms Frances says:

    The Atlantic Ocean, the stories it could and can tell! I thoroughly enjoyed your excellent video. I liked that you included the two little swimming ducks and I believe I saw icebergs! Oceans have been from the very beginning: And God said. “Let the waters under the sky be gathered together into one place, and let the dry land appear” And it was so.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I love that passage, Frances and I am delighted that you enjoyed the video. We visited Newfoundland in April so the wind was chilly and we wore our coats and windbreakers. Oceans are fascinating and the people who study them are dedicated to understanding the secrets held within the deep. https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/oceanographer.html

      Liked by 3 people

  9. cindy knoke says:

    How utterly peaceful and beautiful!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Thank you so much for joining me! Glad you brought your warm coat and hat.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Your video shows the rugged beauty of Newfoundland very well. I’ll bet the wind off the water was biting that day.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Oh Liz, it was bitterly cold when we were on that side of Newfoundland. There are two regions. On the eastern side, the exposure to the Atlantic coast is greater than the more calm eastern side. Both areas are beautiful, but very different based on their connection to the ocean. When I walked up Signal Hill, I tried to imagine the sentries who stood guard on the walls. Signal Hill was the harbour defences from the 17th century to the Second World War. I was very interested in visiting the location where Guglielmo Marconi received the world’s first transatlantic wireless signal in 1901. I love walking history.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. I thought it looked cold that day! I love walking history as well. My favorite place to do it was Jamestown Island. My husband and I would visit is regularly to walk around and feel the history. We never went to the nearby tourist attraction that provided replicas of the buildings.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Clanmother says:

        I looked up Jamestown Island. https://www.nps.gov/jame/island-loop-drive.htm

        What a beautiful place to walk. So much history in every step you take. Thank you for the introduction – I enjoyed taking a virtual walk with you. Hugs!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. It is. I just took a look at the website you posted. I remember each and every spot pictured on the island loop drive. Wistful sigh of nostalgia . . .

        Liked by 1 person

  11. J.D. Riso says:

    What a beautiful, desolate place. Is Torbay on Newfoundland or Labrador? When someone mentions Newfoundland, I always think of The Shipping News, one of my favorite novels.
    Hope you are well, Rebecca and enjoying the end of summer.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Torbay is close to Saint John’s Newfoundland, so in Newfoundland. My goal is to travel to Labrador one day. I have yet to travel to Nunavut which is sparsely populated, another place on my “to see” list. It forms most of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Tundra, craggy mountains and remove villages only assessable by plane. It reminds me of where I grew up in Northern Manitoba, which was only accessible by plane and ore train when I lived there. And it was very cold in the winter. Dave Astor mentioned the Shipping News too. I have just downloaded the book and am looking forward to reading it. I can’t believe that I have never heard of “The Shipping News” before. How is this possible? YIKES!!! Loving this time of year. September is my favorite month. All is well on my side – sending many hugs your way.

      Liked by 2 people

  12. What an extraordinary place, Rebecca. Several years ago, a blogger posted about her trip. I feel like there is something particularly unique to the place. Thanks for these gorgeous photos. Hugs on the wing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      St. John’s is an amazing city. Everyone was welcoming and suggested many places to visit, which included George Street. George Street is iconic. Check out this link: https://www.georgestreetlive.ca/bars/the-underbelly/

      I never made it to Underbelly speakeasy, but I thought you would find this interesting. “St. John’s is not only beautiful, historic, and home to some of the finest people in Canada; it is the oldest city in Canada….This makes the UnderBelly one of the oldest rooms! The UnderBelly resides as Newfoundland’s only Speakeasy.” So many stories…. Sending hugs back!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Now that’s the cat’s pajamas! 🐱

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Mary Jo Malo says:

    Brrrrr! If it weren’t so cool, gloomy, rainy and windy here lately, that iceberg might look refreshing. But seriously, how gorgeous! That sky and those breakers have a beauty and a season all their own. I love your tours to the east coast of Canada and northern coast of Britain. Hugs…for warmth too 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      My dear friend, thank you for joining me on this windy beach. We were soon looking for a place to have afternoon tea for warmth. Newfoundland is an extraordinary place. Every where we went, there was a hearty welcome. The fish & chips were amazing. I was glad that we came when there was still a little cold left in the season. 🤗🤗🤗

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Your video and photos are lovely, Rebecca. Torbay is indeed a peaceful spot.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Clanmother says:

      You live in a beautiful part of Canada Jennifer. I am so glad that I was able to spend time in Newfoundland last year. I am enjoying looking back on the photos!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Please excuse me, dear Rebecca, for coming back to your beautiful and interesting post about Newfoundland and Torbay where, unfortunately, I have never been! When I first saw your images and description I immediately thought that it would probably a perfect place to stay in this period. Big hug Martina

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      You would enjoy Newfoundland. You would receive a heartfelt welcome wherever you go. We visited in April which meant we brought warm sweaters and windbreakers to keep warm when we walked along the shorelines. Our first night in St. John’s we received a recommendation to dine at The Gypsy Tea Room. We were delighted by the atmosphere and genuine hospitality. There is a heartwarming story told by our server that the owner of the Tea Room came to St. Johns’s and began his culinary career as a dishwasher. He knows every aspect of the restaurant business, we were told. I enquired about the story and it was confirmed. Thank you so much for your visit and comments, Martina. Sending big hugs back your way.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It was this kind of stories, which made travelling worthwhile:) Thank you very much Rebecca for your words. Un abbraccio Martina

        Liked by 2 people

  16. Resa says:

    Ah, the east coast! So much rugged beauty is on display there! It is a place to sit and ponder, anywhere you go.
    Amazing how many of your Sunday evening refections, get me reflecting.

    I’m remember Shirley Douglas, Canadian actress who passed in April of this year.
    Daughter of our very own Tommy Douglas (first leader of the NDP, ex-wife of Donald Sutherland, and mother of Kiefer Sutherland.

    She was such an elegant woman. I enjoyed working with her more than I can express. Last time I saw her, she told me about a home she bought on the coast of Newfoundland. It would be her part time home, away from her main home in Toronto.
    I was invited to come out visit, and set a spell. I never did. I can be such a fool!
    Wonderful video, Rebecca, thank you!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      You just reminded me of a podcast that I want to do about Tommy Douglas. Remember when he was voted the greatest Canadian of all time? https://www.cbc.ca/archives/entry/and-the-greatest-canadian-of-all-time-is

      One of my favourite Tommy Douglas quotes is : “Man can now fly in the air like a bird, swim under the ocean like a fish, he can burrow into the ground like a mole. Now if only he could walk the earth like a man, this would be paradise.”

      I read the obit for Shirley Douglas, another outstanding Canadian. I can understand your love for this elegant woman – she was amazing. I wish you had made that visit too, Resa. But, alas, sometimes things are just not meant to be. Many hugs coming your way, my dear friend.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Resa says:

        OH! Do the podcast!
        If Shirley was still here, she would be your guest. I would have asked her for you. She loved being wanted.
        I’ll go check out the link!
        HUGS!

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Resa says:

        Yes.. I remember that, now!
        I found a note Shirley gave me when we finished working on “A House Divided”.
        I also have some pics of her in costumes I did for her, and the gift of a pair of very interesting earrings she gave me.
        I’m going to make a collage photo. I’ll mail it to you. Perhaps it would be useful….somehow.
        NOTE of INTEREST – She played Nellie McClung in a TV movie wayback in 1978.
        Here is her IMDB page – https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0235250/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Clanmother says:

        We are going to do this together! Nellie McClung is also on my list of podcast. Will be in touch.

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Resa says:

        I have a Nellie McClung mural from Winnipeg.
        I did a 3 part- back and forth post with Christy Birmingham, about 4 years ago. Would love to recycle some of the photos. Seems like they deserve more than 1 look see. It’s a brilliant mural!
        Have also read Nellie’s 2 part autobiography.
        You MUST read it, if you have not.
        Not only is it an account of her life and achievements, it is collaterally a documentation of pioneer times in Manitoba. I’ll never get over this life story!

        Liked by 2 people

      5. Clanmother says:

        I found “Clearing the West” and “The Stream Runs Fast” on Kindle. Are those the books that you recommend? I found a lot of biographies, but it would be nice to read her story in her words.

        Liked by 2 people

      6. Resa says:

        Yes !
        There was a book in the early 2000’s by a couple of gals, that combined both of her books into 1. They mopped up a lot of words/ things that don’t exist anymore and made it more accessible to the modern reader.
        You don’t need that! You want the originals.
        I read the 2 books Nellie wrote. Each was in its original wording. I got editions from the 1970’s. I was surprised the library was still loaning them out. Although they have older original editions, they are not loanable.
        Oh, Rebecca! You will LOVE this Canadian historical tale!!!
        I thought & voted for her to be the first woman on Canadian $ bills. She won the popular vote by a LANDSLIDE. Still, Viola Desmond won the honour.

        Liked by 1 person

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