Granville Island Walk in December

“To steward this public land for meaningful urban and social experimentation among diverse, creative, cultural, and business models, engaging local First Nations and communities while welcoming the world.” Mission Statement Granville Island

I have always known Granville Island as the location of a thriving public market and theater district, surrounded by art galleries, vibrant businesses and places for people to connect and celebrate. I understand that there are more than 300 businesses that employ more than 3,000 people situated in this small area of land. Visitors would be amazed that before the Granville Island transformation in the 1970’s, Granville Island was industrial wasteland.

Every step taken on Granville Island holds forgotten memories. Remnants of Granville Island’s industrial past can be found in the streets and buildings.

During the Great Depression, Granville Island was a place where squatters lived. They fished and foraged, sustained by the natural resources of this area.

Going back further into history, Granville Island was a sandbar where the Salish, the Indigenous people of the area, hunted, gathered, traveled, and lived their lives.

Granville Island’s mission statement is to be “the most inspiring public place in the world.” Please join me on a virtual walk through Granville Island.

24 Comments Add yours

  1. Wonderful to read. We have places like that in DUndee which have been completely transformed. Always good to see how a different scenario can rise form the ashes.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Klausbernd says:

    Our dear Rebecca,
    thank you so much for taking us to Granville Island. A well-done film we really enjoyed.
    We are just lazy right now, well, but not Hanne-Dina she is out photographing seals.
    With big hugs and lots of love to all the Budds
    The Fab Four of Cley
    🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Dave Astor says:

    Lovely tour of that island, Rebecca! And those Vancouver skyline shots — wow! Also, as a fellow wearer of glasses, I sympathize with the masks-cause-fogging problem. So annoying, but of course a necessary annoyance!

    Like

  4. Ms Frances says:

    Thank you for this walk around and for the history connected with its past. Granville Island is a lovely place to visit and an exciting place to shop. We have had many happy times there enjoying all the beautiful views, buying little things and of course indulging in the various and delicious foods. Thank you for this reminder of past happy times and for the history lesson–a time I did not know about.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I treasure those memories, Frances and have some great photos of our strolls around Granville Island. Remember the great theatre productions that we attended during December? The Public Market is an exciting place to shop. So many wonderful aromas fill the air. Sending many hugs your way.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. J.D. says:

    Fabulous. I love to hear about former wastelands being turned into oases. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I agree – it is heartening to see that they have not erased Granville Island’s past but have given voice to its history. There are new plans to enhance the area to be more accessible focusing on a place to celebrate art and culture. This is from their visioning session: Granville Island is a zone of public possibility. it bridges our history with our collective creative potential. it is a place to escape the expected.”HCMA Land Use Report Vision Plan.

      I am able to walk to Granville Island – it is about a 15 minute walk, however one of the key issues is the amount of cars that enter this small area. I am certain that this is something that they are considering going forward. I will keep you posted. Thank you for joining me on the walk – love your company.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Jean-Jacques says:

    Enjoyed the promenade thru beautiful Granville Island. As you pointed out, it did not exist, at least when I first travelled to Esquimalt Naval Base of the time, and Vancouver, or much later when time did not permit, for short visits with family or business.
    A tempting site for a future trip though, to visit friends when pandemic conditions are no longer at issue.
    Which brings me to the absolute necessity of wearing a mask. If you’ve need to wear eye glasses, as I do especially for reading, the trick to prevent fogging is to wear your mask slightly higher on your nose and the bottom of the glasses just very slightly over the very top of the mask. That prevents the heat of one’s breath from coming in immediate and direct contact with the cooler material of glasses and frames. Works well and if on needs them on, permanently to see, it does prevent walking into walls etc. Happy next visit, with glasses and safe keeping mask, dear Rebecca!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I love your mask idea! I am heading out today for groceries and will were my mask slightly higher on my nose. We were not in Vancouver for the Granville Island transformation, but did see the transformation of Olympic Village. Over the years I took photos of the progress – now I’m going back into my files to locate these photos, some of them taken before the advent of GPS tagging. This project will keep me busy over the winter months. And speaking of projects – Granville Island has a new initiative underway for 2040. “Granville Island 2040 presents a vision of the future in which these challenges are met, initiating an exciting new phase of growth and development, fostering a renewed passion for creativity and innovation, and a rekindling of the love affair with the Island for new generations. The Granville Island 2040 report looks to the future of Granville Island through the four strategies below.” Check out this link: https://granvilleisland2040.ca/

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Meg says:

    That was a great walk Rebecca! It’s the kind of place with something to interest everyone. I’d like to visit there myself!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      Vancouver is waiting for your arrival. Travel will again come back!!! What I’m doing these days is going back into my photos to relive those travel moments. So glad that you joined me on the walk, Meg!

      Liked by 3 people

  8. It’s always so gratifying to see a city rescue a once derelict area and give it new life for people to enjoy.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I agree wholeheartedly, Liz. Vancouver’s population is increasing and the need for housing and amenities is always with us. Vancouver has had excellent city planners over the years, who know how important green spaces in a growing city.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Green spaces are definitely important in a growing city!

        Liked by 2 people

  9. Paul Andruss says:

    Lovely to see how we can regenerate wasteland. These is a lot wrong with the world, no doubt, but we need to remember and recognise what we have fixed over the past half century or so. And what we will achieve over the next.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      How well said, Paul. We do indeed need to remember and recognize what has been accomplished. Even in our personal experiences, we forget to celebrate what we have achieved before we run off on another project or task. I share your enthusiasm for what can be accomplished over the coming year and years. Happy New Year. The adventures continue.

      Liked by 2 people

  10. For me this was the first time, dear Rebecca, that I heard of Granville Island, the Salish, its art shops or about its history and I enjoyed the walk very much! Thank you very much and I also wish you a very good 2021 with many cultural highlights:) All the best Martina

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      What I love about connecting across the globe is our ability to share places where we live with others via photos and blog posts. I will never be able to travel (especially now) to all the places where I would wished to go, but I can experience them through the people who live there and connect with others. I look forward to sharing 2021 with you, Martina! Sending hugs!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You know, dear Rebecca, I have lately realized that there are some of my friends, who reproach me for all the great trips around the world we have made! I know, of course, that our habits have to change! Big hugs!

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Clanmother says:

        I treasure the travel that I have experienced over the years. Unforgettable experiences that increased my understanding of the world in which we live. Travel will come back but I believe the protocols will be responding to the issues of climate change and looking for ways of reducing our carbon footprint. I read this fascinating article from The Conversation on forecasting how we will travel in 2050. Not sure if I will be here, given that I will be 95 years old! Every day is precious – carpe diem! https://theconversation.com/how-will-we-travel-the-world-in-2050-121713

        Liked by 1 person

      3. You know, I feel like you do about travelling and making experiences and knowing other people, but I can less and less share them with certain people around me!:) It is, of course, also true that this mass tourism has many other negative impact on nature than Co2. In 2050 I would be over 100! Thanks for you link and I will read your article. Carpe diem:)

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Clanmother says:

        Grateful for our friendship and for our virtual travels together, Martina!

        Liked by 2 people

  11. Resa says:

    Amazing!
    When I left Vancouver, the project had begun, but was nowhere what it is today.
    I am so very thrilled to see this.
    More, I am THRILLED to see you in your mask.
    For a presentation, you could have taken your mask off in a safe, allowed place. Yet, you chose to promote safety. My respect for you has grown immensely. You are wonderful, dear Art Director!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Clanmother says:

      I love being your Art Director. I was thinking of you when I photographed the murals, which are located in an enclosed parking lot, that has openings on the sides for people to see what’s inside the building. People walk through and by the parking lot just to view these amazing murals which are on every wall. Granville Island is a wonderful community. Emily Carr University was there for many years until they moved to their new location! I must photograph Emily Carr’s new buildings. They are remarkable. But back to Granville Island. What was Emily Carr University at 1399 Johnson Street will be transformed into “The Arts and Innovation Hub.” Check out this link – I know you will appreciate the creative direction. https://artsandinnovation.com/
      Happy New Year – looking forward to sharing the path with you in 2021.

      Liked by 1 person

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