Voxel Bridge: Entering the World of Augmented Reality

We are living in a time of augmented reality, even though many of us, including me, do not have a full understanding of this technology.

According to Investopedia, augmented reality (AR) is an enhanced version of the real physical world that is achieved through the use of digital visual elements, sound, or other sensory stimuli delivered via technology.”

The definition seems simple, but there are complexities embedded within those words. When we enter augmented reality, we are seeing components that originate within a digital world that blend into our real world. From my observations, we are experiencing two worlds that have become integrated. It is still our reality, but it has been enhanced by a virtual information overlay.

Experiencing Augmented Reality via Voxel Bridge

Augmented reality is not the same as virtual reality, which I often associate with Star Treks’s Holodeck. Virtual reality is about inhabiting an entirely different environment that is created by technology via computers whereas augmented reality uses the existing real-world environment.

Even so, we are entering a new world of possibilities.

In the final episode of the Voxel Bridge, I invite you to enter the world of augmented reality. Are you ready!!?

69 Thoughts

  1. Rebecca , so intriguing! Physical/virtual interaction is blurring the lines of reality. The phenomenon is so interesting and with technology becoming more and more advanced it will be interesting to see where it goes.
    A wonderful post dear Rebecca. Definitely food for thought! ❤️

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I agree wholeheartedly, Holly. Augmented reality is just in the infancy stage and where this will lead, who knows? It will certainly be interesting to see the evolution. I remember the first time I saw people looking into space and seeing something that was hidden using the Pokémon GO app. I think that was the first time I discovered AR.

      Liked by 4 people

    1. It took me a while to figure out how to use the app and I haven’t had a chance to explore all of the options. Jessica Angel appears in the beginning and speaks through the app, which is quite amazing. I believe that artists, poets, writers etc are the guides into new territory. Augmented reality has so many applications from architectural drawings, art galleries, education, to medical training, business logistics, retail, and tourism. Thank you so much for sharing this moment with me. Hugs!!

      Liked by 3 people

    1. I am delighted you stopped by and experienced Voxel Bridge. When I was looking up the definition of augmented reality, I read a very interesting article from Cornell University entitled “Poets, Artists, Game Makes and New Media” which discusses the used of augmented reality it poetry and other artistic forms. We live in a brave new world!!! YIKES! I think you may find this article interesting. https://asianstudies.cornell.edu/poets-artists-game-makers-and-new-media

      Liked by 2 people

    1. I finally figured out how to use the app, which allows me to record the augmented reality layer. I am delighted that you enjoyed seeing the final result of Jessica Angel’s creative endeavour. Artists help us recognize the themes that will be integrated within our daily interactions. Augmented reality is in its infancy with enhancements for medicine, education, connectivity just around the corner.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh Martina – I am glad that the technician was on site when I tried to use my app for the first time. I was having trouble figuring out how to engage with the AR. YIKES! It is indeed like a roller coaster and I haven’t explored all that is under the bridge. Voxel Bridge is one of a kind, but there will be more applications that we will experience without knowing that we are experiencing AR. Artists see the future and are excellent guides to what may be. Sending many hugs along with my thanks for your visit and comments.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Klausbernd for joining me on the final post of Voxel Bridge. Indeed, that is the question that is before us as we enter a brave new world. I am now reading Klara and the Sun on your recommendation. Brilliant and thought provoking. Humanity seems to create complexities that challenge what it means to be real, to live in reality, to be integrated within technology. I will watch the evolution of AR, VR, & Ai as I enjoy my cup of coffee this morning. This moment is the best reality to savour. Sending hugs and love to my dear friends, The Fab Four of Cley.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Amazing (expanding or complement the art). It is surely useful, so long we recognize the limit! 😊
    Although, I would like to try Star Trek’s Holodeck once! 😉 Thank you so much, for this wonderful trip. 🤗🙏💖

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Fascinating and alarming at the same time. I prefer my reality, plain and simple, not augmented! Imagination is augmentation enough! 😉 That said Jessica Angel has done a beautiful job. Thank you for bringing it to life here, my dear Rebecca! Many hugs and wishes for a beautiful week ahead!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I agree – fascinating and ever becoming of more interest within the creative circles of art and literature. I have been researching the advent of AR and Ai in creative endeavours. We are on the very brink of merging technology and creative thought. But the road is not smooth, according to some tech articles I’ve read. I still haven’t figured out how NFFs, blockchain and cryptocurrencies work. And then there is the “reality” of what we imagine will happen is not always what will happen. Meanwhile, I am with you on enjoying my reality, plain and simple. Sending many hugs across the ocean.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I am delighted that you joined me under the bridge, Dave. I have watched Voxel Bridge evolve over the past year and have been looking into the idea of augmented reality. It appears that we are experiencing AR (think Pokémon GO) now and it will become embedded ubiquitously within our society going forward. This is not the future, this is now. Interesting times.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for joining me under the Bridge, Graham. When I was viewing the video, I thought of Marshall McLuhan, a brilliant educator, philosopher, and scholar who coined the terms: “the medium is the message” and the “global village”. Anyway, he wrote, “Once you see the boundaries of your environment, they are no longer the boundaries of your environment.” I don’t fully understand blockchain, NFTs, AR, VR and Ai etc- and probably never will. But I know that we are seeing the boundaries of our environment. We live in interesting times.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Interesting! I think I would find the augmented reality disorienting in real life. Watching it on the computer, it reminded me of movies such as “The Mask” and “Jessica Rabbit” that combine real people and settings with cartoons.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. You bring up an excellent point, Liz. AR is gaining strength over virtual reality and there is a great deal of money being spent on AR technology. But there are problems and a range of socio-technical challenges that need to be addressed before AR technologies see mainstream adoption. AR requires an app or device, which is limiting. The other main issue, which you brought up is what is called visual clutter, which leads to disorientation. Why I was so interested in following Voxel Bridge is that artists see a vision of the future that is different than my vision. One of my friends calls it the “emergence” – those things that disrupt our lives and challenge us to define what it means to live within emerging technologies. Thank you for adding to this discussion – very much appreciated.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. I agree wholeheartedly, Liz. I think we feel our best in nature. As you know, I have been looking back into poetry within public domain to experience the evolution of poetry over the decades. I was interested to read that romanticism is seen as a counterpoint to the Enlightenment. I continue to learn and learn and learn.

        Liked by 3 people

    2. HI Liz, I wonder what effect those types of movies will have on young kids who aren’t really able to distinguish between reality and make believe. My own children seem to appreciate computer stimulated scenes more than they do real life which makes me feel disappointed. I worked so hard to keep computers at bay but, in the end, they have won.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. I think you make a very good point, Robbie about the potential distruptive effect of AR on children’s developmental stage of learning to distinguish reality from make believe. When I was growing up, we kids spent all summer outdoors playing, as long as it wasn’t pouring down rain. There was one kid on the park, Billy Pelkey, who preferred watching television to coming out to play. We all thought there was something wrong with Billy.

        Liked by 3 people

      2. I tried very hard with my sons, Liz. I hosted sandpit parties and all the kids would come and play in the huge sandpit my dad built. They would build castles, forts, and make floods using the hosepipe. I showed them how to make aeroplanes, trains and cars out of sand and we made ponds and floated toy boats on them. They have still become the most computerfied kids in the world, but then, Terence and I work on computers all day and my writing hobby is on my computer too. I just worry about their physical well-being – eye development, muscle development, etc. I don’t have sporty kids, I have kids that ask to go to the apartheid museum instead of the cricket [smile].

        Liked by 3 people

      3. Computers have indeed won, Robbie, which is proved by our interaction within the virtual world. Computers have brought us together within the blogosphere, we have been able to connect over miles and with family members on lockdown. Books, art, poetry come alive online. How much time do we spend on computers as adults? Several hours some days. Everything is connected to computers. Our children have followed in our footsteps and have been exposed to new technologies as a earlier age. When I was looking into augmented reality, (which has become a point of interest to me now that I see that art, literature, education, science, medicine etc have embraced AR), I read a WIRED article which dates back to 2019, which gave me food for thought: “This 8-Minute Galactic Primer Is the Future of AR Education Can augmented reality help children with reading skills? Boring math lessons? Chris Milk and the team at Within believes it can.”https://www.wired.com/story/how-we-learn-augmented-reality-wonderscope/
        We live in a brave new world that challenges us to be attentive. Thank you for our marvelous conversations – you prompt me to think deeply.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Thank you for the link, Rebecca. My big take away from this article is this “turning what otherwise might be brain-rotting screen time into a way to improve their reading skills and knowledge”. If computer time for kids can add real value to their learning and experience of life, then I am all for it. My younger son seems to spend most of his computer time watching ‘rubbish’ on Tiktok and YouTube, and that is my worry. People do post some very weird stuff and I worry about some of the influences. I think I may research this topic of AR learning for my next Growing Bookworms post.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Thank you for showing us this “live” art… in a sense.
    I love it! It’s delightfully deliciously delirious!
    I’ve been trying to get to your podcasts, but I have only 6 more days to watch as many EMMY nominated shows as possible. As a voting member of the academy, I take my participation seriously.
    I’m watching screen in screen, so I can continue using the computer, but I need the sound. I’m watching “Halston” right now. (lovin’ it) I paused it to watch your video.
    I’ve already voted for contemporary costumes. Now I’m watching the Period nominees.
    I let too much time slide. I should have been on it a couple of weeks ago!
    I’m eligible to vote in about 40 categories. Fortunately a lot of the shows repeat in a lot of the categories. {{{HUGS}}}

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Oh, what a exciting time this is for you Resa! The voting is very important because a great deal of creativity and hard word goes into these EMMY nominated shows. The podcasts will be there when you are ready. And I’m looking forward to our discussion on sewing. Thank you for stopping by and for you comments – very very much appreciated. Sending many hugs.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I really enjoyed this really new and different form of art, really. The comments that have followed are excellent and add to the post as well. I just read more about all of the new and present amazing new ways of art, not only AR, but also AI, NFT and more to come. Thank you for this view of the bridge, really, in its own special way, very beautiful. One comment I read elsewhere is that the new ways of art will change our perception in many ways,that we will see Art differently–we will see! !

    Liked by 3 people

    1. When I first viewed the augmented reality through the app, I wondered if this is what people experienced the first time they saw Monet’s painting the first time. I read that the Impressionists faced harsh opposition from the conventional art community in France. Art is ever evolving, which is a good thing. But it does challenge us to see, as you said, art differently.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Oh, Rebecca, this is fascinating and a wonderful advancement of ART…
    This reminds me of the last time I visited the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney, which was a few years back. They highlighted AR in various ways. Probably not quite as advanced as Voxel Bridge AR; however, very exciting with the appreciation of what is already available and the progression to far more AR within our lives.

    You mentioned Star Trek! Hahah.. Last night I watched a Star Trek movie on Netflix. I hadn’t seen any of the movies, but had been a ‘glued to the set’ viewer back in the days of the original TV series. Yes, they are certainly up to date with so much of the fabulous newer technologies.

    We are in for such a great ride!
    xoxoxo

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh, the original Star Trek series was remarkable. They offered an optimistic vision of our future, that it was possible to embrace the difficult challenges and build resiliency as a intergalactic society. Humanity would explore and build strong connections to other worlds. It was a marvelous concept and one that captured the spirit of the great mythologies. “One man cannot summon the future.” Spock “But one man can change the present!” Captain James T Kirk

      I agree wholeheartedly, my dear friend, “we are in for such a great ride!”

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Your descriptive talents are remarkable, Rebecca. Yes, I adored the characters, the premise, of course, and the fact that it was a weekly series. “Go where no man has gone before.” So exciting!

        Yes, we’ll have to hold onto our hats!

        Liked by 2 people

  8. AH, finally this week time to take that walk you with Clansister, Just wonderful to look at this now and I think you are right there in the comment above where you talk about the Impressionists because they were so different and so ahead of their time. For anything to have a future there that thing needs to be constantly evolving and this does it brilliantly, sitting in people’s space, making them think just the same.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I agree wholeheartedly, Shehanne. We are change. We live in change. We will never be free of change. The idea of constant change introduces a high level of complexity in how we embrace life. It is something that I have been looking into for a couple of months because our current reality has demanded our total focus. Just when we thought that we life could go back to a modified normal, we are not back to wearing masks. A vaccine passport is being introduced on September 13, 2021. I believe that books, poetry, art,dance – all the creative endeavours are a way to embrace what is – because it is what it is – and experience a sense of calm and wholeness. I love our conversations!!!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I think these are increasingly becoming the things we find sanity in, Rebecca. That is why we were away hill walking on Monday and also because there it is always what it was and so are the people who do it. We also hope in these things and the assurance that some changes are progress or we’d all still be living in caves. I don’;t know what they are doing in Scotland re passports. They say no it is unethical but then they do what they damn well like.

        Liked by 2 people

    1. I love those WordPress gremlins. I agree – there is a great deal of positive energy that comes out on the video. Next time, I will try to keep my cell phone steadier. I also want to know what it looks like at night. What I love about creative endeavours is that we generate new mythologies. Sending many hugs back to you on the wing.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Wow, Rebecca. My mind is blown. Lol. I didn’t really understand what you were talking about until I watched the video. That was phenomenal. Technology is evolving so rapidly now, it’s stunning. Thanks for sharing that!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am delighted that you joined me in the world of augmented reality. I had no idea what it would look like until I used the app. At present, Voxel Bridge is the largest art installation to use blockchain. Blockchain is something that I do not fully understand. The definition in simple form (which is not simple to me) is “Blockchain can be described as a data structure that holds transactional records and while ensuring security, transparency, and decentralization. You can also think of it as a chain or records stored in the forms of blocks which are controlled by no single authority.”Blockchain.com We live in a brave new world.

      Liked by 2 people

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