FOR ALL TIME – The Shakespeare FIRST FOLIO

The Shakespeare FIRST Folio is a gift to our world.

This is your invitation to join me at the Vancouver Art Gallery to view The Shakespeare FIRST FOLIO.

The First Folio was printed in 1623. Mr. William Shakespeare’s Comedies, Histories & Tragedies arranged Shakespeare plays into the categories: comedies, histories, and tragedies for the first time. There were 36 plays included in this published collection of Shakespeare’s plays, produced seven years after his death. The title page of the First Folio includes an original portrait of Shakespeare, engraved by the artist Martin Droeshout. 

Without the First Folio, it is highly likely that the following well-known and beloved plays would have been lost to the world.

All’s Well That Ends Well, Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, The Comedy of Errors, Coriolanus, Cymbeline, Henry VI, Part 1, Henry VIII, Julius Caesar, King John, Macbeth, Measure for Measure, The Taming of the Shrew, The Tempest, Timon of Athens, Twelfth Night, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, and The Winter’s Tale.

Published by Rebecca Budd

Lifestyle Blogger, Visual Storyteller, Podcaster, Traveler and Life-long Learner

44 thoughts on “FOR ALL TIME – The Shakespeare FIRST FOLIO

  1. Good morning Rebecca, it was so good to see and read your contribution about Shakespeare’s FIRST FOGLIO, in a very pleasant surrounding! I’ve written down the the very touching quote “Out out brief candle! Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then is heard no more” . Thank you very much:)

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I am delighted that you joined me at the Vancouver Art Gallery. What fun it is to learn together. I think that MacBeth is the play I most often go back to read. I confess that King Lear is too dark for me, but I must admit that I love this poignant quotes from King Lear:

      “Have more than thou showest,
      Speak less than thou knowest,
      Lend less than thou owest,
      Ride more than thou goest,
      Learn more than thou trowest,
      Set less than thou throwest”
      William Shakespeare, King Lear

      Liked by 2 people

      1. King Lear was another pivotal moment for me. Have you noticed that a book, play, poem comes just at the right time. It was an extraordinary exploration into authentic love. Love that simply loves for the sake of love of another.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. What would we do without The Taming of the Shew!!! We would never hear the words:

      “Then God be blest, it is the blessèd sun.
      But sun it is not, when you say it is not,
      And the moon changes even as your mind.
      What you will have it named, even that it is,
      And so it shall be so for Katherine. “

      Many thanks for joining me at the Vancouver Art Gallery! I love our conversations.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Well, what a coup for Canada! Yes, actually having a copy of the First Folio in a collection must stimulate research and interest I think. There is something very special about seeing the original, as opposed to a reproduction, however fine. I remember what an impression it made on me when I was able to see the Actual Book of Kells. A memorable moment.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. That must have been an extraordinary moment for you, Margaret! To see the actual Book of Kell would indeed be an unforgettable moment. I am so happy for you!

      During my research into first folios, I came upon the Folger Shakespeare library which has 82 First Folios. Can you imagine!! I understand that each of these folios has an unique back story. I continue to learn and learn and learn!!! I am grateful for the institutions that provide the means by which we can experience and learn from the First Folios!

      https://www.folger.edu/shakespeare/first-folio/meet-folger-folios

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Shakespeare belongs to eternity. He will never be aged, as you said, dear Rebecca. It is an excellent event for you and the city of Vancouver to have the great Shakespeare Folio in such a wonderful Art Galery. I have almost all his works, some of them, published by Pinguin, in his original English: you know? With some words translated at the end! I can never stop enjoying his books. Thank you so much.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I am delighted that you joined me at the Vancouver Art Gallery, Alaedin. Isn’t it fun to celebrate William Shakespeare together. How wonderful that you have his works in his original English! What a great collection.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. What a great idea, Deborah! I’ll be thinking of you this week as your read these words:

      All the world’s a stage,
      And all the men and women merely players;
      They have their exits and their entrances;
      And one man in his time plays many parts,
      His acts being seven ages.
      William Shakespeare, As You Like It

      Many thanks for joining me at the Vancouver Art Gallery!

      Liked by 2 people

  4. That was so enjoyable, Rebecca; I loved joining you at the Vancouver Art Gallery.
    I loved all the quotes you mentioned, and those that could be seen in your video. However, the quote by Ben Jonson is as true today as it was then.
    [Shakespeare] was not of an age, but for all time!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I agree wholeheartedly, Carolyn! Ben Jonson recognized the potential of the now and of the future. Oh, to have his clear vision.

      The Shakespeare quote that I recall on my birthdays is: “With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come.” William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

      Many thanks for your visit and lovely comments.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Rebecca, I loved your on-location reporting about the copy of this all-important folio that will be 400 years old next year! Unimaginable to think that Shakespeare’s work might have been lost to history without it.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you for joining me at the Vancouver Art Gallery, Dave. Many years ago, when Frances took me to my music teacher for piano lessons, she would read “The Tempest” while she waited for the lesson to be over. She read from a book that belonged to my music teacher. Every time we came, my music teacher would hand the book back to Frances, with the bookmark on the page last read. It took several lessons for her to finish the play.

      What a tragedy if we had lost “The Tempest”.

      “Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
      As I foretold you, were all spirits and
      Are melted into air, into thin air:
      And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
      The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces,
      The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
      Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve
      And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
      Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
      As dreams are made on, and our little life
      Is rounded with a sleep.”

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Art Galleries and Museums – they are the most amazing places. Can you imagine what it would be like not to have those 18 plays. We would never have met the three witches.

      “Double, double toil and trouble;
      Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.”

      “Fair is foul, and foul is fair:
      Hover through the fog and filthy air.”

      Liked by 3 people

  6. Lovely post! I felt as though I was there walking about with you! I love the selections that you read. It is so very true….Shakespeare is for all time! No matter how many times we hear certain lines, we learn something new!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Linda for your visit and heartwarming comments. I agree that no matter how many times we hear certain lines, we learn something new. I confess that I knew very little about the First Folio and now am very eager to carry on the research. Have a wonderful day!

      Liked by 2 people

  7. It seems like Shakespeare’s quote about greatness may apply to him, too 🙂 “Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon ’em.”

    Thank you for the reminder of his impact on us!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Love that quote from 12th Night, the first Shakespeare’s play that I read in high school. I’m delighted that you joined me at the Vancouver Art Gallery. Your visit and comments are very much appreciated.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Loved the connecting with your world and the barb. Knowledge and admiration of Shakespeare’s work, has both a plus and a minus effect, as in encouragement and discouragement when attempting to compose one’s own scribbled attempts at and in the language of poetry. This from one who has been at it and doing so for some 40 plus years.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. We are very fortunate to have within our reach an important literary work from almost 400 years ago. Thank you for bringing this treasured book to our attention and so close to us in Vancouver! The book is a very well planned work published in1692 that includes all the plays thar we love and have read, probably more than once! ! Thank you for including the photo of the book. The unique paper pages show the interesting printing and the very look at the page encourages one to start reading! The author was a very handsome man, thank you for including his photo! !

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Dear Rebecca. Thank you for your invitation to join you at the Vancouver Art Gallery for this very special exhibit. I’ve watched your video four times and each viewing reveals new hidden gems about his First Folio. I especially appreciate your closing words: “William Shakespeare is more alive now than ever before. And we ARE the stuff that dreams are made of.” Resonant and wonderfully expressed. A bit of a digression into pop culture if I may. Do you remember the old TV series “Moonlighting” with Cybill Shepherd and Bruce Willis? They did a very creative version of “The Taming of the Shrew” https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ijUr6p8xSBM

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I LOVED watching that Moonlighting episode again. I had forgotten about it until you mentioned it to me. Many thanks for joining me at the Vancouver Art Gallery. I enjoy our conversations and look forward to many more!!!

      “I count myself in nothing else so happy
      As in a soul remembering my good friends.” Richard II

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Dear Rebecca. I’m so glad you enjoyed that Moonlighting episode. It was from around 1986 if I recall correctly and it has aged well, and demonstrates how Shakespeare’s opus has, as well. Love your quote from Richard II. Thank you!

        Liked by 2 people

    1. I am delighted that you joined me at the Vancouver Art Gallery. I just found Shakespeare’s sonnets on Gutenberg press and plan to recite them in the months ahead. I followed Patrick Stewart receive a sonnet a day, which was a wonderful day to celebrate Shakespeare.

      https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/hear-daily-shakespeare-sonnets-sir-patrick-stewart-180974616/

      P.S. Where would we be without the three witches of MacBeth!!!

      Liked by 2 people

  11. Thank you for this, Rebecca!
    I’m a huge fan of Shakespeare, and all the works mentioned here.
    Except… the Henrys … boring, yet revealing of the history of the time. The CNN of its time, he brought the news of his time to the people. True, many of his plays mixed the news of the times into his wonderful tales…but the Henrys…. sigh!
    So proud to have 2 copies in Canada!
    {{{hugs}}}

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am so proud too! This year, Bard on the Beach is coming back Summer 2022. On the MainStage with be “A Midsummer Night’s Dream. There will also be Romeo and Juliet. I can hardly wait to see live theatre!!!

      Liked by 2 people

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