We Shall Not Cease From Exploration

Throughout the centuries, humanity has traveled the planet in search of new places to explore and live. We have crossed oceans on boats, trekked through mountains and deserts, and invented wings for flight. We have gone underground—into mines, caves, and now into space itself! Exploration is embedded in our DNA.

We seek opportunities to see new places, meet new people and have new experiences.

Granville Bridge, Vancouver B.C.

The steady process of discovery is one of the defining characteristics of being human. It is part of what it means to be alive. We see the diversity of life through art, architecture, food, customs, and language. As we learn more about our surroundings, there is a sense that we belong to a greater narrative.

We will never cease from exploration.  And when we return to the beginning, we shall, as T.S. Eliot wrote, “know the place for the first time.”

After traveling for three weeks in September, we returned home fresh from exploring. As we traveled to Granville Island via the False Creek Ferry, I felt that sense of seeing the skyline of Vancouver for the first time.

“We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.”

T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets
Burrard Bridge, Vancouver, B.C.

Published by Rebecca Budd

Blogger, Visual Storyteller, Podcaster, Traveler and Life-long Learner

48 thoughts on “We Shall Not Cease From Exploration

    1. Thank you for joining me on the water taxi, Mary Jo. It was great to be traveling after the 3 year hiatus, but what I learned over the past two years is that travel is possible even when travel has been curtailed. Perhaps, I have learned that the word “explore” has many definitions and is not constrained by movement. We explore where we are, we learn when we are stationary, we accept what comes with equanimity. It is good to be home, having tea and a stack of books ready for the winter months. Sending many hugs!

      Liked by 4 people

      1. I have never been to Granville Island, Rebecca, and very much enjoyed this excursion to this, for me, unknown place and in your company:) Besides, I also very much feel that travelling can happen in many ways, also just within ourselves. Many thanks for this touching post:)

        Liked by 2 people

      2. I agree, Martina. To me, travel within ourselves is the most powerful and life-changing journey that we can make. At times, it is not for the faint of heart. I am delighted that you joined me on the water taxi. Next time, we’ll head into the market. It is the off season now so it will be easier to navigate between the stalls of fruits and vegetables. I like to go early in the morning, when the bread comes out of the ovens. Smells delicious!❤️❤️❤️

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Oh,Rebecca, what beautiful prospects, because I really love to squander across markets, and of course, especially early in the morning. It’s a good feeling to travel with you on the same boat 💖💖💖

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Excuse me, Rebecca, I wanted to say that I loved the prospects of “strolling” with you through the market and breath in the various delicious flavours from here!
        All the best in the meantime :):):)

        Liked by 2 people

      5. Actually, I liked the word “squander” – it says exactly what it is like to walk through Granville Island. I love squandering the time away looking at the fruits and vegetables, the different kinds of cheeses, and specialty breads. Whatever tasks are on my to-do list for the day, can wait. Sending hugs back your way.

        Liked by 2 people

  1. There’s an old quote I once read “We don’t see things as they are; we see them as we are.” Your, and T. S. Eliot’s words reminded me of it. I think it says so much about you that you have the capacity to see the old and the familiar from a new perspective, in a new light, and see something new and full of wonder, and to be able to share it with the rest of us. Thank you for doing that. Thank you for the new perspective. Thank you for this moment of awakening.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thank you for travelling with me to Granville Island. I am delighted that we connected and am enjoying our conversations that always give me something to consider and think about. I LOVE the title “Endless Weekend.”

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Amen to that! We missed travelling too – though it seems it’s become more difficult, even though we can now resume moving about. Virtual travel with you is much easier – and almost as rewarding!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. What I have learned over the past two years is that virtual travel is possible, that I can connect with others across the miles as if they were having tea in my living room. Exploration is within us and when we find kindred spirits along the way, life becomes even more exciting and enjoyable. Sending hugs!

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes!!! Sometimes what we discover is that is nice too! And this is what I had discovered while on my travels: I had planned to read Dark Observation by Catherine Cavendish when I returned home. Well, I couldn’t wait. I started on page one, then went to page two and then on and on. Cat is brilliant. Many thanks for the introduction. I am now onto “The Malian Witch” which is perfect for Halloween!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Rebecca. She writes more ‘Gothic’ horror, than slasher. And Gothic is what I prefer. My fav is still the Pendle Curse because she took a real story where we know the ending and still made it a page turner.

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Rebecca, I could write a lot in answer or simply just tell you that I also love exploration. Travelling and staying. Immersing and feeling. Rich cultures and beautiful places as well as darker.
    You say it is built in our DNA, that sounds true.
    It is true, you see your own home clearer and differently when you return. At times I feel as if my spirit arrives a couple of days after my body. Quite deep impressions.
    Thank you for this beautiful post.

    miriam

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you Miriam for your insightful and heartwarming comments. I know exactly what you mean when you wrote “feel as if my spirit arrives a couple of days after my body.” I am grateful that we can explore together. I enjoy following your posts – you always give me something to take with me to think about in the days ahead.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. It is absolutely accurate and well said, dear Rebecca. Curiosity in humans is always hungry for something new, and we have to appreciate it. As the Germans say, you never stop learning, so it’s good to explore limitlessly. Thank you for this beautiful clip.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Many thanks, Alaedin for your visit and comments. I agree wholeheartedly – humanity has a insatiable appetite for exploration, learning and connecting. We can never stop learning for that is the spark that ignites our creativity.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Photos of your fair city bring back memories of our lovely trip there five years. ago.

    About the T. S. Eliot quote: I’ve used it to review memoirs I’ve read. It’s suitable because authors who write about their lives often see things differently when they reach the end of the story. Eliot underscores that fact, I think. Thanks, Lady Budd! 😀

    Liked by 2 people

    1. An excellent thought, Marian. We do see things differently and actually remember events as we think that were. I remember looking back at a specific event when I was in my thirties. And now, a couple of decades later, I remember the event differently. The difference is subtle, but unmistakable. Thank you for adding depth to this conversation. P.S. One day you must return to Vancouver!!!

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Wise and eloquent reflections, Rebecca! Travel can indeed be so wonderful and broadening; glad you’ve been finally getting a chance to do a lot of it again in our sort-of-post-pandemic world. Love the awe-inspiring video and photos!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thank you, Dave, for your lovely comment. I confess that I was hesitant to travel, even with travel restrictions loosening. What these past two years have taught me, is that life can change suddenly and that we must respond with courage and hope. I also learned to travel virtually. And of course, books are portable magic. These past year I have travelled to Egypt, Africa, China, Russia, England and the list goes on. No jet lag!!! And the cost of travel was exceptionally low.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. There are two water taxi companies in Vancouver, both started from humble beginnings. Over the years they became a viable (& essential) transportation system that serves tourists and locals. The employees are amazing – enthusiastic and knowledgeable. To become a water taxi skipper or deckhand there are certain requirements that you much obtain. What is most interesting is meeting fellow travelers, some coming from far away places.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. This is a beautiful video, I enjoyed it several times. It is a very good continued video from your last video from several weeks ago. It was good watching just to listen to the wonderful melody you chose to accompany your colorful choice of the city streets and shoreline. Thank you for sharing! !

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for joining me on the water taxi, Frances. It is a fun and relatively quick way to travel to Granville Island. Granville Island has changed considerable over the past three decades, but it has always kept its charm. Someone called it the “stomach” of Vancouver.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. We have learned a great deal over the past years about how to stay connected via virtual means. It is good to see that travel has opened up and that we all know the safety protocols that will ensure everyone’s wellbeing.

      Liked by 1 person

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