Writing for Purpose

Standard

Summer Flowers

Why write? There’s always a reason or purpose to scribble on a piece of paper. Over the years, my writing has been associated with work– business reports, letters and correspondence, case studies and academic research. I never considered my words and sentences as “real” writing.

Indeed, many consider writing to be in the form and context of the social sciences or literature. Most writing, however, occurs in every day moments – a thank you to a friend; a text message to and from a co-worker; an e-mail from a supervisor. Writing involves a complex skill set that involves creative thinking, cognitive development and understanding the community in which you are a participant. In its simplest and most profound structure, writing is communication. Every time we type a word or scrawl a quick note, we engage in the noblest purpose of all – a conversation. As Albert Camus eloquently stated, “the purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.”

Paulo Coelho said, “Tears are words that need to be written.” What better way to acknowledge the grieving process.

Friedrich Nietzsche declared, “All I need is a sheet of paper and something to write with, and then I can turn the world upside down.” Words are a powerful force.

Anaïs Nin reflected, “The role of the writer is not to say what we can all say, but what we are unable to say.” Becoming a writer is choosing to look at life differently, to see beyond the immediate, to accept our responsibility to seek the greater good.

The Music Plays On…

Standard

An evening concert in the mountains – with children as musicians – still lingers softly in my mind many years later. When the instruments were put away, the earth continued to hum the musical refrain.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music.” 
― Friedrich Nietzsche