Sharing Knowledge

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“You are forgiven for your happiness and your successes only if you generously consent to share them.” 
Albert Camus

Knowledge

Themistoclea, the sacred priestess at Delphi, and mentor of the renowned Pythagoras, did not hoard knowledge. Zeno of Elea, famous for his mind-bending paradoxes, did not hoard knowledge. Diotima of Mantinea willingly shared her ideas on Platonic love while Arete of Cyrene wrote 40 books during her 35 years of teaching the next generation of philosophers.

We live in the age of information, where technology allows us to connect with others on the other side of the globe in a matter of seconds.  Yet, there is a ubiquitous fear that if we share knowledge we may be at a disadvantage.  Within a highly competitive job market, dispensing shards of knowledge on a “need to know basis” is not uncommon.

Great thinkers share knowledge, without fear that their personal power will be eroded.   Joseph L. Badaracco, a professor of Business Ethics at Harvard Business School, suggest that “In today’s environment, hoarding knowledge ultimately erodes your power.  If you know something very important, the way to get power is by actually sharing it.”

Thank you to my friends in the blogging community for sharing your knowledge, your creativity and your enthusiasm.  Our power is growing exponentially.

Knowledge is power. Information is power. The secreting or hoarding of knowledge or information may be an act of tyranny camouflaged as humility. 
Robin Morgan, an American Poet, Author, Political Theorist and Activist

The Philosophy Narratives

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“Man is the only creature who refuses to be what he is.”
Albert Camus

 The Beginning

The other day, someone asked me, “What is your philosophy of life?”

We talk about philosophy as if it were something that could be summarized in one or two sentences.  And yet, it generally takes a lifetime to identify with the reality. It is more than a thought, a response or a single activity.  It is our entire worldview, our personal system of principles for guidance in practical affairs.

The “philosophy question” has been in the back of my mind over the past couple of weeks, especially as I was researching the ancient scientists.  It seems that their philosophy was the precursor to their scientific investigations.

Philosophical discussions rarely have neat and tidy outcomes because the business of philosophy is to challenge prevailing assumptions and concepts in order to generate new perspectives on complex problems.  This week will focus on beginnings.  That is the only place that will give us the genesis of this worthy conversation that has spanned the history of humanity.

“Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” 
 Plato

 

Writing for Purpose

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Summer Flowers

Why write? There’s always a reason or purpose to scribble on a piece of paper. Over the years, my writing has been associated with work– business reports, letters and correspondence, case studies and academic research. I never considered my words and sentences as “real” writing.

Indeed, many consider writing to be in the form and context of the social sciences or literature. Most writing, however, occurs in every day moments – a thank you to a friend; a text message to and from a co-worker; an e-mail from a supervisor. Writing involves a complex skill set that involves creative thinking, cognitive development and understanding the community in which you are a participant. In its simplest and most profound structure, writing is communication. Every time we type a word or scrawl a quick note, we engage in the noblest purpose of all – a conversation. As Albert Camus eloquently stated, “the purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.”

Paulo Coelho said, “Tears are words that need to be written.” What better way to acknowledge the grieving process.

Friedrich Nietzsche declared, “All I need is a sheet of paper and something to write with, and then I can turn the world upside down.” Words are a powerful force.

Anaïs Nin reflected, “The role of the writer is not to say what we can all say, but what we are unable to say.” Becoming a writer is choosing to look at life differently, to see beyond the immediate, to accept our responsibility to seek the greater good.

Walk Beside Me

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“Don’t walk behind me; I may not lead. Don’t walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.”
Albert Camus