Sunday Evening Reflection – Spring Awakening

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That is one good thing about this world…there are always sure to be more springs.” L.M. Montgomery, Anne of Avonlea

A Spring Walk

“And the Spring arose on the garden fair,
Like the Spirit of Love felt everywhere;
And each flower and herb on Earth’s dark breast
Rose from the dreams of its wintry rest.”

Percy Bysshe Shelley, The Complete Poems

Whenever I feel the uncertainty of a moment, a lingering fear of the unknown or sense of urgency, I go to nature and feel the strength of the earth under my footsteps. The trees bestow their gracious welcome as the sounds of the forest fill my soul with a peaceful silence. The sky, the wind, the sun and clouds remind me that I belong to this world. I am home.

Spring has arrived.

As a global community, we are learning to reinvent our lives. The road turned and we have come upon an unexpected detour. The path may be unclear, but we are together. And that gives me great comfort. Join me on my nature walk and consider the words of the poet, Mary Oliver.

Hello, sun in my face. Hello you who made the morning and spread it over the fields…Watch, now, how I start the day in happiness, in kindness.” Mary Oliver

The promise of spring.

Sunday Evening Reflection – With Alberto Giacometti

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It is impossible to do a thing the way I see it because the closer I get the more differently I see.” Alberto Giacometti

Vancouver Art Gallery is my “go-to” place for creative inspiration. Last year, I recorded my walk from the Vancouver Seawall by Cambie Bridge to the Art Galley located in Vancouver Centre. I wanted to document my visit to an extraordinary exhibition: Alberto Giacometti – a line through time.

Alberto Giacometti is considered one of the most important sculptors of the 20th century, which was dramatically evidenced by this extraordinary exhibition. Influenced by the Cubism, Surrealism and Expressionism movements, his work was a search into the human condition.

All the sculptures of today, like those of the past, will end one day in pieces… So it is important to fashion ones work carefully in its smallest recess and charge every particle of matter with life.” Alberto Giacometti

Once the object has been constructed, I have a tendency to discover in it, transformed and displaced, images, impressions, facts which have deeply moved me.” Alberto Giacometti

Please join me on my walk to the Vancouver Art Gallery. For more photos check out my SmugMug portfolio link: Alberto Giacometti

Sunday Evening Reflection: Transits and Returns

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“Transits and Returns brings together the work of 21 Indigenous artists from across the Great Ocean and offers a closer look at what connects their practices but also how they are distinct.”
Vancouver Art Gallery

What better way to begin the week than with a visit to the Vancouver Art Gallery?

Five Indigenous curators: Tarah Hogue (Senior Curatoral Fellow of Indigenous Art at the Gallery), Sarah Biscarra Dilley, Freja Carmichael, Léuli Eshrāghi and Lana Lopesi created a vibrant exhibition that celebrated the journeys of participating artists.

I was overwhelmed with this brilliant collaboration showcasing the rich artistry, craft and creative spirit of cultures, places and stories. Join me on a Sunday Evening Reflection with Transits and Returns.

For more photos of the extraordinary exhibition, please link into my  SmugMug Photo Gallery

Transits & Returns, VAG September 28, 2019 – February 23, 2020 from Rebecca Budd aka Clanmother on Vimeo.

 

Oh, How I Long For Home, 2016

 

Sunday Evening Reflection – The Way Things Were

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Orkney, with its well documented Neolithic and Viking heritage attracts visitors from around the globe. We are enticed by the narrative of our ancient past that is shrouded in the mist of long ago. We come to find the stories, to feel the kinship of humanity, to marvel at how we have prevailed over the millennium.

Orkney has many historical moments that speak of courage, determination, perseverance that are closer to our time. Tonight, I am remembering the way things were in the not so distant past. Join me as I enter the world of Kirbuster farm, where farmers shared a connection with the land.

Orkney’s soil is fertile. Even today, agriculture is the most important sector of Orkney’s economy, with most of its land taken up with farming – grazing for sheep and cattle as well as for cereal production. Farming today may be more efficient, but one thing that remains the same – Orkney’s farmers, over the centuries, have held a great love and respect for the earth.

Special thanks go out to my dear friends, Lorna and Carrie of See Orkney Tours, for giving us the most amazing Orkney adventure.

Kirbuster Farm Museum in Birsay provides a fascinating glimpse into life on a traditional Orkney farm during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The farmhouse was occupied until the 1960s before being reopened as the musum in 1986. It’s the last un-restored example of a traditional ‘firehoose’ in Northern Europe, with the house built around a central hearth and peat fire. There is also a stone neuk bed and a peat fire, with the rooms full of old household implements and furniture.Kirbuster Farm Museum

Sunday Evening Reflection: At the Orpheum

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The Vancouver Orpheum

The Vancouver Orpheum opened its doors on November 8, 1927. Ah, it was a grand building, the largest theatre in Canada at the time, with a construction price tag of $1.25 million.  Three thousand seats awaited an audience eager to see the interior of the much-awaited theatre.

Buildings have biographies and encounter transitions that reflect our ever-changing societies. Would it surprise you to know that the Vancouver Orpheum was launched as a vaudeville house? The vaudeville that became popular in North America from the early 1880s until the early 1930s, was similar to the music halls of Victorian Britain.

When the voices and acts of vaudeville’s singers, dancers, comedians and magicians fell silent in the late 1930’s, the Orpheum became a movie house, under the Famous Players name.

The crisis occurred in 1973.

In 1973, Famous Players made a financial decision that would change the course of our beloved Orpheum’s history. The Orpheum was scheduled for a major upgrade to a multiplex.  The magnificent interior was to be gutted.  The public protest was heard across Vancouver and beyond.  Even Jack Benny made an emotional appearance.

The Orpheum was saved.

The City of Vancouver bought the Orpheum and closed the theatre on November 23, 1975 to complete a full restoration. April 2, 1977 the Orpheum was reopened and is now the permanent home of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. Two years later, in 1979, the Orpheum was designated a National Historic Site of Canada.

During December, our family attended a performance of Handel’s Messiah.  After the crowds dispersed, I stayed behind to capture a few photos to celebrate the history of this noble building and all those who came together to save its legacy for generations to come.

Come, join me on a short walk through a building that has graced Vancouver for nearly 100 years.

 

Music by Cercles Nouvelles “Palace Garden Roses” Epidemic Sound

Sunday Evening Reflection: Who has seen the wind?

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The wind and trees have a special relationship. Together, they create exquisite music that comes with fluttering leaves and waving branches. The fresh air that trees bestow on this earth brings a sense of well-being.  A recent Instagram post by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization stated that “studies show that trees boost happiness and reduce stress levels.”

Trees are the vital source of fruits, medicines, oxygen.  They decrease the greenhouse effect and prevent soil erosion, which in turn prevents water pollution.  Under the shade of trees, wildlife find protection.

Tonight, I am celebrating trees with poetry by Christina Georgina Rossetti.  Embracing the dance of the wind and trees.

Who has seen the wind?

Who has seen the wind?
Neither I nor you.
But when the leaves hang trembling,
The wind is passing through.

Who has seen the wind?
Neither you nor I.
But when the trees bow down their heads,
The wind is passing by.

Christina Georgina Rossetti