Sunday Evening Reflection – Canada in Winter

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Canadian winters are legendary.  Think Snowmageddon St. John’s Newfoundland this past weekend and Edmonton, Alberta’s coldest morning of this century: Wednesday morning (January 15, 2020) when the temperature set a record  of – 37.8 degrees Celsius.  I grew up in Northern Manitoba where the average temperature in January is considered “severely cold.”  So, when Vancouver had a winter storm warning this past week, it felt like we had joined the rest of Canada.

I love our winters – the snow, cold air, the fresh smell.  Yes, I can smell when snow is in the forecast.

Canadians know how to embrace the cold!

  • Buy boots with removable liners and be sure that your feet don’t feel cramped.
  • Wear a hat and cover your face. I learned firsthand what it felt like to have frozen cheeks.
  • Buy a thermos so that you can bring along a hot drink if you are walking. You will notice that I have a stash of regular and herbal tea on hand in winter months.
  • Protect your hands. While I love gloves, mittens are even better for keeping your fingers warm.
  • And if you are in cold, cold, cold weather, check out those fashionable fleeced-line leggings. Your legs will thank you.

Vancouver’s snow is disappearing with the rain, but I captured the moment.  Join me on my snow walk.

All Aboard

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It’s January which means resolution time.

And of course, my exercise program is firmly in place, set to begin tomorrow, or the next day or the next.  You know how it is when the winter sets in and the tea, cozy chair and stack of books are in desperate need of our immediate attention.

But I was inspired by the “All Aboard” crowd at Granville Island.  Now this would be an amazing exercise program.

All Aboard, Mini-Ramp Pilot Project, Granville Island

I was even more impressed by the “All Aboard” pilot project that “demonstrates the need for a publicly accessible, dry, well lit, safe and fun skateboard facility in Vancouver during the winter months.

Happy exercising! (And reading, too!)

All Aboard from Rebecca Budd aka Clanmother on Vimeo.

Sunday Evening Reflection – Waiting

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“Nature looks dead in winter because her life is gathered into her heart. She withers the plant down to the root that she may grow it up again fairer and stronger. She calls her family together within her inmost home to prepare them for being scattered abroad upon the face of the earth.”

Hugh Macmillan, “Rejuvenescence,” The Ministry of Nature, 1871

 

Winter has come and, with it the promise of long winter evenings of reading in the coming cold days of January and February.  I have a stack of books at the ready and have signed up to a competitive family book reading challenge that has set me on a course of discovery. Winter is a time of respite and renewal, waiting, preparing…

The soil appears to be dormant, but there is unseen activity happening in the depths of the earth in preparation for the coming of spring.  So it is with us.  May we “gather our life” in the same way as Nature and recognize the beauty of a winter landscape.

Join me as I look back on the late blooms of Autumn, just before Nature called her family together.

 

 

Solitude: A September Garden from Rebecca Budd aka Clanmother on Vimeo.

Farewell to Winter

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Remnants of Winter

Remnants of Winter

Spring has come.  The daffodils announced the arrival of a new season, which was underscored by the rainy days that followed.  In the Northern Hemisphere, the world has stirred as if from a deep sleep and is welcoming a warmer sun.  Even as I embrace the energy of rebirth, I cannot help but recall the comfort of hearth and home where tea and a fine book filled the long winter nights.  Winter is a time of respite and contemplation that accompanies an inner journey.

In the midst of the new growth, the remnants of winter remain as a reminder to seize the moment, for winter will come again.

“Carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.”

“Seize the day, and put the least possible trust in tomorrow.”

Horace