Finding Love

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Paris

“I want nothing from love, in short, but love.” 
Sidonie Gabrielle Colette, La Vagabonde

Sidonie Gabrielle Colette found love and happiness when she met Maurice Goudeket, a young businessman turned journalist.  They met in 1925, married on April 3, 1935 and remained together under Colette’s death in 1954.  This was her longest and happiest relationship.  During the last 20 years of her life, Colette suffered from a debilitating arthritis.  Even so, she continued to write about her impressions, recollections and fantasies.  Colette published Gigi in 1945 when she was 72 years old and lived to see her novel made into a film in 1948.  She would have been pleased to know that Vicente Minnelli directed a musical adaptation in 1958.

“Chance, my master and my friend, will, I feel sure, deign once again to send me the spirits of his unruly kingdom. All my trust is now in him- and in myself. But above all in him, for when I go under he always fishes me out, seizing and shaking me like a life-saving dog whose teeth tear my skin a little every time. So now, whenever I despair, I no longer expect my end, but some bit of luck, some commonplace little miracle which, like a glittering link, will mend again the necklace of my days. ” 
Sidonie Gabrielle Colette

24 thoughts on “Finding Love

    • So do we all! We are meant to love and be loved. Colette was able to express this thought clearly and compassionately.

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  1. Fantastic ! It’s so true: ” Colette was able to express this thought clearly and compassionately.” I like that !

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  2. Necklace of my days ; wonderful image. Makes me think of the wonderful Beads of Courage programme for children undergoing cancer treatment. I am now going to have a think about my life in terms of a necklace!

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    • You always send me on a treasure hunt!!! I looked up the website for Beads of Courage. Very interesting – fits in beautifully with the spirit of Colette’s vision of the necklace. “Beads signify strength and courage Just like medals, ribbons and certificates, many ancient and modern-day cultures use beads to show bravery and accomplishment. They have long been used to protect warriors from natural and supernatural enemies, along with lending special magical protection for heroes during long journeys.” I too, am going envision the “necklace.”

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      • I have a collection of necklaces which I love greatly and they come from all different periods of my life but I am wondering how I would put together one single necklace. And I am going back to your images of Colette to see what necklaces she may be wearing! Glad you found the website for the Beads of Courage.

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      • Isn’t that interesting! Colette’s greatest love, her third husband, was a dealer of fine pearls…

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  3. Yes, will be satisfied with just plain love.
    But if there is a cook, dishwasher and handy man that come with it…………

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  4. I’m going to pick up a copy of La Vagabond when I go to Brussels in April. I read it quite a few years ago, in French, and I’m sure that some of it escaped me. The quotes are so exquisite.

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    • I am continually amazed by Colette’s ability to distilled complexity into a single word or a short sentence. For example, she was the one who came up with “Live in the moment.”

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  5. I want nothing from love, in short, but love. Concise statement, for sure. Interesting the picture of links and necklace. Many use beads in worship, a wonderful way to keep our mind and thoughts on track.

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    • I agree – beads give focus! They keep us attentive, in a world that has us ever moving from one thought to another and another…

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