The Story Pole

Standard

All that we are is story. From the moment we are born to the time we continue on our spirit journey, we are involved in the creation of the story of our time here.”

Richard Wagamese

June 21, 2019, Canada is celebrating National Indigenous Peoples Day (French: Journée nationale des peuples autochtones) to recognize the vibrant cultures and contributions of the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Indigenous peoples of Canada. Festivities are happening all across our nation.

Join me as I commemorate this day with the Story Pole which was placed in Beacon Hill Park and dedicated to the City of Victoria on July 2, 1956

Majestic, resilient, a silent storyteller that overlooks the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

The Story Pole was carved by a team led by Mungo Martin, Kwakiutl tribal chief and renowned carver.  At the time of its creation, it was the world’s tallest free-standing Story Pole or Totem Pole, rising into the sky nearly 128 feet or close to 39 meters.

Totem poles are monumental carvings that hold stories that remember ancestors, symbolize legends, preserve cultural beliefs and speak of historical events. They welcome visitors, even as they care for the well-being of the community. Carved from large trees, mostly western red cedar, by First Nations and indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest coast, tradition calls for totem poles to return to the earth from where they first came. So it will be with this Story Pole.

There is an end to their natural lives, but their stories live on.

“It is what we arrive with. It is all we leave behind. We are not the things we accumulate. We are not the things we deem important. We are story. All of us. What comes to matter then is the creation of the best possible story we can while we’re here; you, me, us, together. When we can do that and we take the time to share those stories with each other, we get bigger inside, we see each other, we recognize our kinship – we change the world, one story at a time…”

Richard Wagamese

 

Story Pole from Rebecca Budd aka Clanmother on Vimeo.

Celebrating World Oceans Day

Standard

On World Oceans Day, people around our blue planet celebrate and honor the ocean, which connects us all. Get together with your family, friends, community, and the planet to start creating a better future. Working together, we can and will protect our shared ocean. Join this growing global celebration on 8 June!”

Today, I am celebrating our oceans, that wide expanse of blue that bestows an abundance of benefits to humanity.

Oceans resonate with our creative spirit. We feel alive when the salt air touches our face and a brisk wind buffets our bodies.  We revel in the sounds of waves splashing against the shoreline, recognizing we stand on the edge of an infinite grandness.

Oceans cover 70% of the Earth’s surface, regulating our climate and weather patterns. The ocean produces over 50% of the world’s oxygen and stores 50 times more carbon dioxide than our atmosphere.   Oceans offer a pharmacopoeia of medicines, ingredients that fight cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer’s diseases and heart disease. More than one billion people depend upon the ocean for sustenance.  Nearly 50% of the world’s population lives within a coastal zone and are engaged in ocean-based businesses to support their families.  From an economic perspective, oceans are the shipping routes for 90% of international trade.

Without oceans, we would not survive.

We live in a complex time where climate change, shrinking resources, and population growth are challenging us to participate in creating sustainable communities.

Everyone has a vital role to play, beginning with celebrating our precious oceans.

 

“For most of history, man has had to fight nature to survive; in this century he is beginning to realize that, in order to survive, he must protect it.”  Jacques-Yves Cousteau

World Oceans Day – A Celebration from Rebecca Budd aka Clanmother on Vimeo.

A River Flows Through Our Lives

Standard

We need the tonic of wildness…At the same time that we are earnest to explore and learn all things, we require that all things be mysterious and unexplorable, that land and sea be indefinitely wild, unsurveyed and unfathomed by us because unfathomable. We can never have enough of nature.” 

Henry David Thoreau, Walden

My father often spoke of Henry David Thoreau and his book Walden; or Life in the Woods. As we celebrate Easter today and Earth Day tomorrow, I am reminded that nature conspires to bestow a peaceful grace upon humanity and all who share our world

Let the heavens be glad, and let the earth rejoice; let the sea roar, and all that fills it; let the field exult, and everything in it! Then shall all the trees of the forest sing for joy.

Psalm 96:11-12

I find great joy in the memories of conversations with my father. I share his profound belief in our need to be fully engaged within nature. Like Thoreau, he recognized that heaven was “under our feet as well as over our heads”

A River Flows Through Our Lives from Rebecca Budd aka Clanmother on Vimeo.

World Water Day – Leaving No One Behind

Standard

March 22, 2019 celebrated World Water Day, which is the annual UN observance day that highlights the importance of freshwater. The day is used to advocate for the sustainable management of freshwater resources.  I am writing this on March 23, 2019 to reaffirm my commitment to participate in this important dialogue.

Whoever you are, wherever you are, water is your human right.

Water Day 2019 – This year’s call to action is to leave no one behind:

Sustainable Development Goal 6 is crystal clear: water for all by 2030. By definition, this means leaving no one behind. But today, billions of people are still living without safe water – their households, schools, workplaces, farms and factories struggling to survive and thrive.

Living Water Smart provides the B.C. Government’s vision for sustainable water stewardship and sets the direction for changes to water management and water use. These changes are crucial for adapting to climate change impacts and the pressures placed on water resources from a growing population and economy.

Water from Rebecca Budd aka ClanmotherA

Celebrating International Wetlands Day

Standard

“I believe you should try to help your community if you’re fortunate enough to have that opportunity. I think you should leave something behind.”

John E. Poole (1917-2007)

Today is World Wetlands Day. I am celebrating by remembering a day in October 2017 when I walked along the interpretative trail and boardwalk of the John E. Poole Wetlands near St. Albert, Alberta.

The air was pure Alberta, Canada.

The snow had not yet arrived but there was the unmistakable hint of the cold winter that would soon blanket the area. Vancouver is surrounded by the majesty of mountains, but Edmonton and St. Albert are encircled by a big sky that goes on to an infinite horizon.

John Poole died in his 90th year, suddenly and peacefully on January 22, 2007, after a joyous family birthday celebration. Thirty years before in 1977, he sold his construction company to its employees, which is now known as PCL Construction. The company continues to be 100 percent owned by employee shareholders across Canada, the United States, and Australia.

John Poole devoted his retirement years to philanthropy and was beloved for his knowledge, creativity and humanity. In 2009, Ducks Unlimited and PCL Construction announced the creation of the John E. Poole Conservation Fund to help preserve wetlands throughout the province.

World Wetlands Day is held annually on February 2nd, to commemorate the date of the adoption of the Convention on Wetlands called the Ramsar Convention on February 2, 1971. The Convention is the intergovernmental treaty that provides the framework for the conservation and wise use of wetlands and their resources.

The John E. Poole Wetland is a call to action. The preservation of our wetlands is safeguarding life on our planet. Wetlands are biologically diverse ecosystems that provide habitat for many species, serve as buffers on the coast against storms and flooding, and naturally filter water by breaking down or transforming harmful pollutants.

This is our time, our watch – may we celebrate our wetlands by seeking environmental solutions in our daily lives. We can make a difference.

Join me in walking the John E. Poole Wetland:

My dear friends, The Fab Four of Cley, were celebrating World Wetland Day too! We belong to a compassionate blogging community that spans the globe!
https://fabfourblog.com/2019/02/01/world-wetland-day/

Between Celebrations

Standard

The week between December 25 and New Year’s Eve is a time of respite. After the excitement generated by the joyful lead-up to Christmas, December 26 signals a time to take a breath, and welcome the coming winter months that entice us with a stack of books and copious amounts of tea.

The streets and stores have quieted, waiting for New Year’s festivities to begin. Even Granville Island has taken on a charming calmness.

Granville Island in December

A colourful day-planner is close at hand, open to January 2019, with Karen Lamb’s call to action, “A year from now you may wish you had started today” on the first page.   Usually, I use my on-line calendar to keep track of my important events and engagements, but this year I decided that the act of writing would add to “living the moments.”    Especially now, that 2019 is the last year of a remarkable decade, to be replaced by 2020.

Granville Island in December

As we await the coming of 2019, may we enjoy these in-between days.  There will be time for busyness.  But for this special time, I am resting up for the adventures and conversations that await us in a New Year.

Happy New Year!

Granville Island – Christmas from Rebecca Budd aka Clanmother on Vimeo.