Sunday Evening Reflection: The Moss Lady

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“Even a soul submerged in sleep is hard at work and helps make something of the world.”

 Heraclitus, Fragments

Sleep is our best friend, bringing us the gifts of good health and well-being and allowing us to live our best life. In our joy of being awake, we cannot forget that sleep allows us many benefits.  Even the ancients knew that “Even a soul submerged in sleep is hard at work and helps make something of the world.”

After a restful night’s sleep, our decisions are more in-tune, our learning improves as does our memory and physical reflexes.  We pay attention to our environment and our emotional state is more relaxed.  Our world view is enhanced and with it our creativity.  Sleep is our best friend.

Last fall, I met the Moss Lady in Beacon Hill Park, Victoria, British Columbia.  She came to life in 2015 and was inspired by the Mud Maid in Cornwall’s Lost Garden of Heligan.  Artist Dale Doebert worked with the Victoria City park team to create the elegant 35-feet-long Moss Lady, using boulders, pipes, cement and wire.  She rests serenely under a specially designed clay-based acidic soil so moss can cloak her while she sleeps.

You are welcome to join me on the path to visit the Moss Lady. May we embrace the gift of sleep in the same spirit as this gracious lady.

Remembrance Day 2019: Lest We Forget

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“The Homecoming” by sculptor Morgan MacDonald

Tonight, as the twilight closes in on November 11th, Remembrance Day, I think of my Father who was one who came back from WWII. The day he left home for the first time, in a soldier’s uniform at 18 years of age, he remembered hearing his mother playing a hymn on the piano as he walked down the road. There was no certainty, only a knowledge that life was precious.

Earlier this year, I traveled to St. John’s Newfoundland. It was a place that has always been on my “to visit” list ever since I studied the map of Canada in my early grades. Bannerman Park in St. John’s holds a poignant reminder of the sacrifices made by those of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment soldiers and their families.

The Homecoming” brings to mind both joy and sorrow, and the need to come together as a community.

It’s passing on the torch to the next generation.” Sculptor Morgan MacDonald

The Unsolved Mystery of Leg-in-Boot

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The year 1887.

They found a human leg trapped in a boot. As the story is remembered, the leg washed up on the shore of False Creek. No one claimed it, even though it was prominently displayed in the local police station for all to view. No one showed up or even appeared to be interested in the unusual display. It remains an unsolved mystery.

The police station is no more. Yet, the narrative remains alive, over 100 years later,in the name, Leg-in-Boot Square. And now there is great interest in the current display – Acoustic Anvil: A Small Weight To Forge The Sea.

Leg-in-Boot Square, once a thriving part of False Creek’s industrialization, has taken on a more serene, even sedate, orientation. The chaotic mishmash of forges, boat-builders and stevedores, has been replaced by walkers, runners and bikes that share the Vancouver Seawall. It is a place of respite with benches offering a view of Vancouver’s ever growing skyline and the sailboats berthed at the nearby marina.

Art remembers and gives voice to our histories and legends. This month, the “Acoustic Anvil: A Small Weight to Forge the Sea” gives a hearty nod to Vancouver 1887. Maskull Lasserre has created a massive sculpture, with measurements of approximately three-by-eight-metres, to celebrate False Creek’s industrial era.

The Acoustic Anvil arrived on Thursday, July 19th at 10:30. Dramatic, vibrant, solid – those were the words that came to me when I reached out my hand for the first touch. Then I heard the music.

“What is the sound? Where is it coming from? Where does it transport you.”

The Drop

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“The role of the artist is to ask questions, not answer them.” Anton Chekhov

Water!

The ubiquitous compound, consisting of two atoms of hydrogen and one atom of oxygen in every molecule, supports our very existence and safeguards our world and all inhabitants that call earth their home.

Water is important – we recognize this axiom.

Do we understand our responsibility to that truth?

In our reality, we are facing profound and complex questions of who will share the clean water? the fresh air? and nutritious food?

We are a global community with global agendas that will demand our full participation and collaboration.

We can count on artists to signal a call to action. Along the Vancouver Seawall that passes by Vancouver Convention West, “The Drop” stands tall, a forceful reminder that life is embedded in drops of water